Feedback/Notes

 

Latest Activity

Loren Miller commented on Loren Miller's group Quote Of The Day
"Atheism is not a philosophy; it is not even a view of the world; it is simply an admission of the…"
20 minutes ago
Stephen Brodie commented on Adriana's group Freethought and Funny Bones
"Government guidelines say facemasks' should be worn over both mouth and carrotSnowman built by…"
41 minutes ago
Stephen Brodie commented on Adriana's group Freethought and Funny Bones
"Good one Mrs B"
1 hour ago
Joan Denoo commented on Loren Miller's group Quote Of The Day
"Chris B, thanks for the Martin Luther King, Jr. quote!"
1 hour ago
Chris B commented on Loren Miller's group Quote Of The Day
3 hours ago
Mrs.B commented on Adriana's group Freethought and Funny Bones
13 hours ago
Mrs.B commented on Doone's group Humans of Earth News
"I'm sure those two were cut from the same cloth."
17 hours ago
Mrs.B commented on Adriana's group Freethought and Funny Bones
"Hahahaha....we even have Kick Ass & Smart Ass coffees..."
17 hours ago
Mrs.B commented on Loren Miller's group Quote Of The Day
"We got store-bought bread cubes, & a tiny cup of water for the sacrament, so I didn't miss…"
17 hours ago
Stephen Brodie commented on Doone's group Humans of Earth News
"Doone. As a person who voted to remain in the EU, I'm not at all surprised that it's…"
22 hours ago
Stephen Brodie commented on Doone's group Humans of Earth News
"That's very sad I enjoyed watching Mira Furlan in Babylon 5. A very underestimated TV…"
22 hours ago
Loren Miller commented on Doone's group Humans of Earth News
"To the list of those recently departed, I should like to add the name of Mira Furlan.  Those…"
23 hours ago
Doone commented on Doone's group Humans of Earth News
"Which is the dumbest country in the World…"
23 hours ago
Loren Miller commented on Loren Miller's group Quote Of The Day
"When Galileo rejected the Vatican’s astronomical dogma, he wasn’t rejecting only their…"
yesterday
Stephen Brodie commented on Adriana's group Freethought and Funny Bones
"When we in the UK say that man deserves a kick up the arse it just wouldn't sound right any…"
yesterday
Onyango Makagutu commented on Adriana's group Freethought and Funny Bones
"Funny ass man"
yesterday
Onyango Makagutu replied to Ruth Anthony-Gardner's discussion Religious Justification to Overthrow Democracy in the group Right Wing Whackos
"Hahahaha. So Biden is Trump's double?"
yesterday
Onyango Makagutu commented on Loren Miller's group Quote Of The Day
"Mrs.B, you left too soon hahaha before they started offering lunch and all."
yesterday
Joan Denoo commented on Doone's group Humans of Earth News
"@Grinning Cat, truer words were never spoken!"
yesterday
Joan Denoo commented on Adriana's group Freethought and Funny Bones
"My former husband, a career military man, claimed that when an officer reached a certain level,…"
yesterday

We are a worldwide social network of freethinkers, atheists, agnostics and secular humanists.

Meteors will light up the winter sky

The Quadrantids, one of the best but least-known meteor showers, will shine in the new year.

By Michael E. Bakich

Meteor-finder-chart
A rush of meteors will populate the predawn sky January 3. Although the Moon will drown out fainter meteors, the Quadrantid shower should still produce a high percentage of bright ones. //Astronomy: Roen Kelly
The annual Quadrantid meteor shower usually is one of the year’s best, and in 2013, it will once again provide a nice display. Throughout the Western Hemisphere, the shower reaches its peak before dawn January 3. Unfortunately, a waning gibbous Moon also is in the sky, and its light will obscure the dimmer streaks. The Quadrantids generate a high percentage of bright meteors, however, so it should still rank among the year’s best showers.

Astronomers are predicting that the Quadrantids will peak around 8 a.m. EST January 3. That time works best for Asia, but North American meteor-watchers should also keep an eye out because predicting meteor showers remains inexact.

You’ll need a clear, dark sky to see more than just a few Quadrantids. “Dark” means at least 40 miles (60 kilometers) from the lights of a large city. You won’t need a telescope or even binoculars — in fact, the eyes alone work best because they provide the largest field of view.

Astronomy magazine Contributing Editor Mike Reynolds spoke about an important detail: “Comfort counts when observing meteor showers. Remember, this event takes place in January, so you must keep warm. Observing meteors is not a physical activity. You’ll probably just be sitting.”

When you’re ready to start observing, set up a lawn chair, preferably one that reclines. To see the maximum number of meteors, just look overhead. Glancing around won’t hurt anything.

Reynolds advises observers to keep a running tally of meteors. “By doing that,” he says, “you’ll get a good idea of how your site compares with observing sites around the world.”
Quadrantid-meteor
This 2012 Quadrantid meteor was easily visible above the imager’s home despite the bright gibbous Moon and the city lights of Dayton, Ohio. // John Chumack

How many Quadrantids will you see? Most years under clear, moonless conditions, observers count 60 to 200 meteors per hour from a dark site (with an average of about 120).

The shower’s radiant (the point from which the meteors seem to originate) lies in the northern part of the constellation Boötes the Herdsman, which will lie low in the eastern sky at midnight and overhead at dawn. The Quadrantids get their name from the defunct constellation Quadrans Muralis the Mural Quadrant, which used to occupy this region of sky. This region climbs some 60° high in the northeast by the time morning twilight begins.

Read the rest here

Views: 50

Replies to This Discussion

This is something I wish I could have watched but it was about minus 24° celsius this morning here !

RSS

© 2021   Created by Atheist Universe.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service