Feedback/Notes

 

Latest Activity

Stephen Brodie commented on Loren Miller's group Quote Of The Day
"Nice one Loren  "
42 minutes ago
Loren Miller commented on Loren Miller's group Quote Of The Day
"Well, so long as we're on the topic of Omar Khayyam:"
2 hours ago
Stephen Brodie commented on Loren Miller's group Quote Of The Day
"None of Khayyam's poetry wasn't published in his lifetime because much of his work would…"
2 hours ago
Loren Miller commented on Loren Miller's group Quote Of The Day
"What a shame, Stephen.  I'm not certain, but I think there is a copy of the Rubaiyat in…"
2 hours ago
Mrs.B commented on Loren Miller's group Quote Of The Day
"Yes, he does."
3 hours ago
Stephen Brodie commented on Loren Miller's group Quote Of The Day
"Loren I was once given a beautifully bound copy of the Rubaiyat by Omar Khayyám. I…"
5 hours ago
Loren Miller left a comment for Guilin HBM Health
"Greets and welcome to Atheist Universe!  Please enjoy your time here."
9 hours ago
Loren Miller commented on Loren Miller's group Quote Of The Day
"He (the Rev. Mr. Whitefield) used, indeed, sometimes to pray for my conversion, but never had the…"
10 hours ago
RichardtheRaelian left a comment for Klinger
""Happy Birthday!""
15 hours ago
Loren Miller commented on Loren Miller's group Quote Of The Day
"How much more of the mosque, of prayer and fasting? Better go drunk and begging round the taverns.…"
yesterday
Mrs.B commented on Sydni Moser's group Coffee Break
"Yes, I do that regularly.....VERY regularly. Fingers seem to have their own mind."
yesterday
Ian Mason commented on Sydni Moser's group Coffee Break
"Yes, Mrs B. A slip of the fingers."
yesterday
Mrs.B left a comment for Guilin HBM Health
"Good to see you here."
yesterday
Mrs.B commented on Sydni Moser's group Coffee Break
"Do you mean ''desanctify''?"
yesterday
Terence Meaden left a comment for Guilin HBM Health
"Welcome welcome. Among other possibilities, do join the active Loren Miller's group with its…"
yesterday
Stephen Brodie commented on Doone's group World History
"The REAL Israelite Religion: Interview with Dr. Francesca Stavrakopoulou Interesting discussion on…"
yesterday
Stephen Brodie left a comment for Guilin HBM Health
"Welcome Guilin HBM Health AU"
yesterday
Guilin HBM Health is now a member of Atheist Universe
yesterday
Ian Mason commented on Sydni Moser's group Coffee Break
"Words that first appeared in Webster's dictionary in my birth year, 1956. I like that…"
yesterday
RichardtheRaelian left a comment for Nadine Gary
"Hello Nadine! I take it by the formation of your group that your a member of the Raelian movement…"
yesterday

We are a worldwide social network of freethinkers, atheists, agnostics and secular humanists.

The Antikythera Mechanism: the world's oldest computer (100 BCE)

This video is amazing, I didn't even know this computer existed and that it was discovered a century ago. Watch these guys reconstruct the clever mechanism designed by the Greeks, using Lego blocks!

 

The Antikythera Mechanism: http://bit.ly/fm4oFK is the oldest known scientific computer, built in Greece at around 100 BCE. Lost for 2000 years, it was recovered from a shipwreck in 1901. But not until a century later was its purpose understood: an astronomical clock that determines the positions of celestial bodies with extraordinary precision. 

In 2010, we built a fully-functional replica out of Lego. 

Sponsored by Digital Science: http://www.digital-science.com/ a new division of Macmillan Publishers that provides technology solutions for researchers. Available under a CC-BY-3.0-Unported license.

Antikythera Mechanism Research Project http://www.antikythera-mechanism.gr

 

Views: 194

Replies to This Discussion

Ancient Greek Computer Had Surprising Sun Tracker

The world’s oldest astronomical calculator is famous for having intricate gear systems centuries ahead of their time. But new work shows the Antikythera mechanism used pure geometry, as well as flashy gears to track celestial bodies’ motion through the heavens.

The device, a 2,000-year-old assemblage of gears and wheels that matched 19th century clocks in precision and complexity, was salvaged from a shipwreck off the Greek island of Antikythera in 1901.

Called the Antikythera mechanism, the machine gracefully kept track of the day of the year, the positions of the sun and the moon, and perhaps the other planets. It also predicted eclipses and kept track of upcoming Olympic games.

Most of the mechanism’s calculations were driven by a series of 37 interlocking dials, which may have been manipulated by a hand crank. The front of the mechanism had a clock-like face that denoted the calendar date in two concentric circles, one showing the signs of the Greek zodiac, and one carrying the Egyptian months of the year.

Three hands denoting the date and the position of the sun and the moon moved through the zodiac and the months as the gears turned.

“It’s a pretty elaborate piece of machinery,” said science historian James Evans of the University of Puget Sound in a presentation at the University of Washington in Seattle on March 31. “Nobody would ever have guessed that there could be something this complex in the second century [BC].”

Earlier research showed the device also accounted for a subtle weirdness in the motion of the moon. Because the moon’s orbit around the Earth is an ellipse, not a perfect circle, the moon seems to speed up and slow down over the course of a month. In 2006, Tony Freeth of Cardiff University and colleagues showed that a clever configuration of two overlapping gears, with the top gear laid off-center from the bottom gear, could give the moon’s marker its irregular speed.

 

Because of the Earth’s elliptical orbit around the sun, the sun makes a similarly variable trip across the sky, speeding up and slowing down over the course of the year. But the effect is much more subtle than for the moon.

I'm not surprised that 2k years ago humans were able to produce such a machine. They had the means to describe the algorithm, and the technology used was basic (metal). And I'm not surprised that the knowledge was lost, as these relatively hi-tech contraptions were unique and their secrets well kept to protect the power they afforded. Those who were able to utilize such a device, let alone conceive one, were the educated elite. Perhaps it was the first big scam: using the machine to make "supernatural" predictions to the masses. And when the culture, or even a given regime, dies, some of its best accomplishments go with it.

What astounds me is that, at the time, no one thought to "port" the technology to solve other kinds of problems. Had they done it, had this knowledge been shared, methinks the world could be quite different from what it is now.

Who knows what else is out there, maybe we'll find other great machines the ancient Greeks had built! I wonder where they were taking the machine, since it was recovered from a shipwreck. Was it a prototype and they wanted to sell others, or did they want to impress the neighbors?

Yes.

Perhaps the ship was heading for Rome.

They pretty much controlled the area at that time.

Amazing,humankind is truly remarkable,glad to have seen video and history behind it,the knowledge is always welcome,one can always hope intentions were good to have such a device,powerful in simple hands,or knowledge for the logical beholder.

RSS

© 2021   Created by Atheist Universe.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service