Feedback and Notes

 

Imagine No Religion

Latest Activity

Mrs.B commented on Doone has Fremdschämen's group Canada, Mexico most of the World and Some Nutty Country Suffering from Fremdschämen about Scumpism News
3 hours ago
Doone has Fremdschämen commented on A Former Member's group Animal | Vegetable | Mineral | Fungus or Scump
4 hours ago
Doone has Fremdschämen commented on A Former Member's group The Burgeoning Family Tree of Monkey Men and Women
4 hours ago
Doone has Fremdschämen commented on A Former Member's group The Burgeoning Family Tree of Monkey Men and Women
4 hours ago
Doone has Fremdschämen commented on Doone has Fremdschämen's group Canada, Mexico most of the World and Some Nutty Country Suffering from Fremdschämen about Scumpism News
4 hours ago
Mrs.B commented on Doone has Fremdschämen's group Canada, Mexico most of the World and Some Nutty Country Suffering from Fremdschämen about Scumpism News
4 hours ago
Doone has Fremdschämen commented on Doone has Fremdschämen's group Canada, Mexico most of the World and Some Nutty Country Suffering from Fremdschämen about Scumpism News
5 hours ago
Mrs.B commented on Adriana's group Freethought and Funny Bones
5 hours ago
Stephen commented on Adriana's group Freethought and Funny Bones
6 hours ago
Stephen replied to Chris's discussion 1918, 11/11 11:00
6 hours ago
Tom Sarbeck replied to Chris's discussion 1918, 11/11 11:00
7 hours ago
D L replied to D L's discussion Should Governments regulate fraudulent religions?
7 hours ago
Mike Lansing replied to D L's discussion Should Governments regulate fraudulent religions?
8 hours ago
Mrs.B commented on Hope's group Imagine No Religion, Please!
10 hours ago
Stephen commented on Hope's group Imagine No Religion, Please!
10 hours ago
Doone has Fremdschämen commented on Doone has Fremdschämen's group Canada, Mexico most of the World and Some Nutty Country Suffering from Fremdschämen about Scumpism News
12 hours ago
Chris replied to Chris's discussion 1918, 11/11 11:00
14 hours ago
Chris replied to Chris's discussion 1918, 11/11 11:00
14 hours ago
Suzanna commented on Adriana's group Freethought and Funny Bones
15 hours ago
Chris replied to Chris's discussion 1918, 11/11 11:00
15 hours ago

We are a worldwide social network of freethinkers, atheists, agnostics and secular humanists.

Information

World History

A group about World History so that I do not end up spamming my USA and Non USA News Group

Location: #culture
Members: 19
Latest Activity: on Thursday

Discussion Forum

How the British Divided Up the Arab World

Started by Hope. Last reply by Chris Oct 15, 2016. 7 Replies

How the British Divided Up the Arab WorldThe development of the modern nation states throughout the Arab world is a fascinating and heartbreaking process. 100 years ago, most Arabs were part of the…Continue

Tags: Arab, World, Up, Divided, the

History Snippets

Started by Doone has Fremdschämen. Last reply by Tom Sarbeck Oct 12, 2016. 3 Replies

AN AMERICAN CREATION STORYby Akim ReinhardtThere is scientific evidence indicating that Asiatic peoples migrated…Continue

Tags: Snippets, History

Old Time Religion and Buildings

Started by Doone has Fremdschämen. Last reply by Onyango Makagutu Nov 30, 2012. 1 Reply

Tatev Monastery - Tatev, ArmeniaThe Tatev monastery once played a notable role in the advancement of medieval Armenian culture when it housed the University of Tatev in the 14th and 15th…Continue

Tags: Buildings, and, Religion, Time, Old

THE FALL OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE AND THE RISE OF ISLAM

Started by Doone has Fremdschämen. Last reply by Doone has Fremdschämen Jul 11, 2012. 2 Replies

THE FALL OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE AND THE RISE OF ISLAMTom Holland in The Guardian:Whenever modern civilisations…Continue

Tags: AND, RISE, ISLAM, EMPIRE, ROMAN

Comment Wall

Nice Comment

You need to be a member of World History to add comments!

Comment by Doone has Fremdschämen on June 24, 2012 at 9:32pm

Stonehenge was monument marking unification of Britain

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120622163722.htm

June 24, 2012

ScienceDaily (June 22, 2012) — After 10 years of archaeological investigations, researchers have concluded that Stonehenge was built as a monument to unify the peoples of Britain, after a long period of conflict and regional difference between eastern and western Britain.

Its stones are thought to have symbolized the ancestors of different groups of earliest farming communities in Britain, with some stones coming from southern England and others from west Wales.

The teams, from the universities of Sheffield, Manchester, Southampton, Bournemouth and University College London, all working on the Stonehenge Riverside Project (SRP), explored not just Stonehenge and its landscape but also the wider social and economic context of the monument's main stages of construction around 3,000 BC and 2,500 BC.

"When Stonehenge was built," said Professor Mike Parker Pearson of the University of Sheffield, "there was a growing island-wide culture -- the same styles of houses, pottery and other material forms were used from Orkney to the south coast. This was very different to the regionalism of previous centuries. Stonehenge itself was a massive undertaking, requiring the labour of thousands to move stones from as far away as west Wales, shaping them and erecting them. Just the work itself, requiring everyone literally to pull together, would have been an act of unification."

Stonehenge may have been built in a place that already had special significance for prehistoric Britons. The SRP team have found that its solstice-aligned Avenue sits upon a series of natural landforms that, by chance, form an axis between the directions of midsummer sunrise and midwinter sunset.

Professor Parker Pearson continued: "When we stumbled across this extraordinary natural arrangement of the sun's path being marked in the land, we realized that prehistoric people selected this place to build Stonehenge because of its pre-ordained significance. This might explain why there are eight monuments in the Stonehenge area with solstitial alignments, a number unmatched anywhere else. Perhaps they saw this place as the centre of the world."

Although many people flocked to Stonehenge June 21 for the summer solstice, it seems that the winter solstice was the more significant time of the year when Stonehenge was built 5,000-4,500 years ago.

Professor Parker Pearson said: "We can tell from aging of the pig teeth that higher quantities of pork were eaten during midwinter at the nearby settlement of Durrington Walls, and most of the monuments in the Stonehenge area are aligned on sunrise and sunset at midwinter rather than midsummer. At Stonehenge itself, the principal axis appears to be in the opposite direction to midsummer sunrise, towards midsummer sunset, framed by the monument's largest stone setting, the great trilithon."

Comment by Doone has Fremdschämen on June 22, 2012 at 7:06pm

A NUN'S STORY — LESSONS FROM HISTORY

Via Elizabeth A. Lehfeldt at Wonders & Marvels:

It is not often that my research is topical.Nun's storyMost people feign polite interest when I tell them I study sixteenth-century Spanish convents. But with the recent controversy over the Catholic Church’s scrutiny of the behavior and activities of American nuns, the subject of female monasticism has enjoyed an unprecedented timeliness.

My goal in this essay is not to enter the twenty-first century polemic; I’m much more comfortable in the sixteenth century. I would offer, however, the following observation: that certain assumptions and even stereotypes undergird the remarks of some of the participants in the current debate.  And here is where history can be so useful. Arguably, we root some of our modern interpretations of nuns in what we think convents were like in the premodern period.

Read more here.

Posted by Zujaja Tauqeer at 02:49 PM | Permalink

Comment by Doone has Fremdschämen on June 14, 2012 at 6:56am

Jun. 13, 2012

funny pictures history - Refreshing Oppression
When you’re russian for a drink there’s no time for stalin.

Comment by Doone has Fremdschämen on May 19, 2012 at 6:12pm

NOTES FROM ICELAND

Justin Erik Halldór Smith in his blog:

ScreenHunter_10 May. 19 23.16I am in Iceland for the first time in many years, for no better reason than that Icelandair offers extended stopovers on transatlantic flights at no additional cost. I cross the Atlantic as casually as one might take the subway from borough to borough, but now that I am here, again, in Reykjavik, it seems to me that, if we have to fly at all, stopovers in Iceland should not just be possible, but mandatory. They make it all make sense.

This basalt island, really only a side-effect of the volcanic eruptions of only one segment of the vast Mid-Atlantic Range (which also includes something called the 'Charlie Gibbs Fracture Zone', where by contrast I hope never to find myself): this island, I say, is not all that far from the Faeroes, which are in turn a short hop to the Hebrides, and from there another shorter one to mainland Scotland. In the other direction, there is really only a channel, and not open ocean, separating Iceland from Greenland, and again a smaller one separating Greenland from Baffin, and Baffin from Labrador.

A series of small hops then, brings one from Europe to North America, and even in the absence of archaeological evidence it is not hard to understand why, when Jacques Cartier sailed up the St. Lawrence in the 1530s, local Iroquois ran out to greet the ship with furs in hand, ready, to all appearances, to resume a well established trade.

More here.

Posted by Abbas Raza at 05:17 PM | Permalink 

Comment by Doone has Fremdschämen on May 19, 2012 at 12:27am

WHAT MAKES COUNTRIES RICH OR POOR?

Diamond_1-060712_jpg_470x420_q85Jared Diamond reviews Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty by Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson, in the NYRB:

There is no doubt that good institutions are important in determining a country’s wealth. But why have some countries ended up with good institutions, while others haven’t? The most important factor behind their emergence is the historical duration of centralized government. Until the rise of the world’s first states, beginning around 3400 BC, all human societies were bands or tribes or chiefdoms, without any of the complex economic institutions of governments. A long history of government doesn’t guarantee good institutions but at least permits them; a short history makes them very unlikely. One can’t just suddenly introduce government institutions and expect people to adopt them and to unlearn their long history of tribal organization.

That cruel reality underlies the tragedy of modern nations, such as Papua New Guinea, whose societies were until recently tribal. Oil and mining companies there pay royalties intended for local landowners through village leaders, but the leaders often keep the royalties for themselves. That’s because they have internalized their society’s practice by which clan leaders pursue their personal interests and their own clan’s interests, rather than representing everyone’s interests.

The various durations of government around the world are linked to the various durations and productivities of farming that was the prerequisite for the rise of governments. For example, Europe began to acquire highly productive agriculture 9,000 years ago and state government by at least 4,000 years ago, but subequatorial Africa acquired less productive agriculture only between 2,000 and 1,800 years ago and state government even more recently. Those historical differences prove to have huge effects on the modern distribution of wealth.

Posted by Robin Varghese at 07:24 PM | Permalink 

Comment by Doone has Fremdschämen on May 17, 2012 at 8:34pm

Ramree Island, Burma

Ramree Island, Burma

Ramree Island may be in the beautiful Burma, but nothing about this place is beautiful. It's actually just a giant swamp full of thousands of saltwater crocodiles—which are the deadliest in the world—plus mosquitos loaded with malaria, oh, and venomous scorpions. Also, there was a six-week long battle here during WWII, in which only twenty Japanese soliders survived... out of 1000. And most were killed by the wildlife.

Comment by Doone has Fremdschämen on May 17, 2012 at 8:34pm

St. Helena

St. Helena

If you somehow end up in the same place where Napoleon was imprisoned and spent his final days, things are probably going wrong. Oh yeah, and there's no functioning airport, either. The only way you can get on or off the island is via container ships from South Africa. Which only come every few months.

Comment by Doone has Fremdschämen on May 15, 2012 at 1:35pm

Time Line of European History

Comment by Doone has Fremdschämen on May 15, 2012 at 8:56am

The Origin Of The Taco

According to Jeffrey Pilcher, author Planet Taco: A Global History of Mexican Food, it's pretty recent:

My theory is that it dates from the 18th century and the silver mines in Mexico, because in those mines the word “taco” referred to the little charges they would use to excavate the ore. These were pieces of paper that they would wrap around gunpowder and insert into the holes they carved in the rock face. When you think about it, a chicken taquito with a good hot sauce is really a lot like a stick of dynamite. The first references [to the taco] in any sort of archive or dictionary come from the end of the 19th century. And one of the first types of tacos described is called tacos de minero—miner’s tacos. So the taco is not necessarily this age-old cultural expression; it’s not a food that goes back to time immemorial.

Comment by Doone has Fremdschämen on May 10, 2012 at 10:59am

WALK LIKE A ROMAN

Beard_266360k

When the ancient geographer Strabo described the native inhabitants of the Iberian Peninsula, he listed – with a predictable combination of relish, horror and exaggeration – all kinds of aspects of their weird barbarity. Some of the Spanish tribesmen, he insisted, stored vintage urine in cisterns and then bathed in it, or used it to clean their teeth. Others dressed their women up with iron rods around their necks rather than jewellery. Others, still stranger, appeared to have no gods. No less remarkable, for Strabo, was the bafflement some of these poor Spaniards felt at the day-to-day habits of their new Roman allies or conquerors. One group of tribesmen, he explained, visiting a Roman camp and seeing some generals taking a stroll, “walking up and down the road”, thought they were “mad and tried to take them back into their tents”, either to sit down and rest, or get up and fight. Despite Strabo’s patronizing tone, it’s one of those rare occasions where we can catch a glimpse of the barbarian point of view on the Romans. The Spaniards presumably thought that walking was something that got a person from A to B (or from tent to battleground). What on earth then were these Roman generals doing as they ambled around, chatting, but not actually going anywhere?

more from Mary Beard at the TLS here.

Posted by Morgan Meis at 09:34 AM | Permalink

 

Members (19)

 
 
 

© 2018   Created by Atheist Universe.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service