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We are a worldwide social network of freethinkers, atheists, agnostics and secular humanists.

Information

World History

A group about World History so that I do not end up spamming my USA and Non USA News Group

Location: #culture
Members: 18
Latest Activity: 7 hours ago

Discussion Forum

How the British Divided Up the Arab World

Started by Hope. Last reply by Chris Oct 15, 2016. 7 Replies

How the British Divided Up the Arab WorldThe development of the modern nation states throughout the Arab world is a fascinating and heartbreaking process. 100 years ago, most Arabs were part of the…Continue

Tags: Arab, World, Up, Divided, the

History Snippets

Started by Doone. Last reply by Tom Sarbeck Oct 12, 2016. 3 Replies

AN AMERICAN CREATION STORYby Akim ReinhardtThere is scientific evidence indicating that Asiatic peoples migrated…Continue

Tags: Snippets, History

Old Time Religion and Buildings

Started by Doone. Last reply by Onyango Makagutu Nov 30, 2012. 1 Reply

Tatev Monastery - Tatev, ArmeniaThe Tatev monastery once played a notable role in the advancement of medieval Armenian culture when it housed the University of Tatev in the 14th and 15th…Continue

Tags: Buildings, and, Religion, Time, Old

THE FALL OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE AND THE RISE OF ISLAM

Started by Doone. Last reply by Doone Jul 11, 2012. 2 Replies

THE FALL OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE AND THE RISE OF ISLAMTom Holland in The Guardian:Whenever modern civilisations…Continue

Tags: AND, RISE, ISLAM, EMPIRE, ROMAN

Comment Wall

Nice Comment

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Comment by Stephen on April 25, 2018 at 9:31am

Wow that reminds me of the Constantine's head in Rome

Comment by Doone on April 25, 2018 at 9:16am

Man of La Venta , Olmec Civilization This colossal stone head in La Venta, Mexico was discovered back in 1947.

Comment by Stephen on April 17, 2018 at 4:16pm

Medieval Italian Man Replaced His Amputated Hand With a Knife

Italian anthropologists have documented a remarkable case in which a Medieval-era Italian male not only managed to survive the amputation of his right hand, he also used a bladed weapon as a prosthetic limb.
Over 160 tombs have been excavated at the Longobard necropolis of Povegliano Veronese in Veneto, Northern Italy, but this skeleton, pulled from the ground in 1996, is entirely unique. Dated to between the 6th and 8th centuries, the specimen, dubbed T US 380, is an older male who survived long after the amputation of his right hand. But as new research published in Journal of Anthropological Sciences now shows, he replaced the missing appendage with a knife, which he attached to the stump with a cap, buckle, and leather straps. What’s more, dental analysis shows he tied it on with his teeth.


The updated analysis of the skeleton, led by anthropologist Ileana Micarelli from the University of Rome, suggests the man’s right hand was removed by a single blow. Many Longobard males were involved in warfare, so it’s possible he lost it during combat. It’s also possible that it was surgically removed as part of some medical intervention, or it may have been chopped off as a judicial form of punishment, a behavior known among the Medieval Italian Lombards.
Regardless of what happened, it’s clear from the paleontological evidence that T US 380 survived the amputation, and the injury healed rather nicely. In fact, he managed to live for a very long time afterwards. Micarelli and her colleagues say it’s a remarkable example of a human surviving the loss of a limb prior to the introduction of sterilization techniques and antibiotics. The case suggests the presence of community-level support and an environment in which intensive care and healing could take place. It also shows that Longobard medics, or whoever performed the procedure, knew a thing or two about preventing blood loss.
Further analysis of the man’s bones points to the use of a prosthesis. Bony healing tissue called callus formed around the ends of the bone, which likely formed as the result of frequent biomechanical force. Supporting archaeological evidence exists in the form of a knife, a cap on the stump, and a D-shaped buckle with decomposed organic material around it, likely leather. Other male skeletons found at the site were buried with their arms by their sides, but T US 380 had his right arm placed across his torso, and a knife blade with the butt aligned with his amputated wrist.
But there’s other evidence as well. The specimen’s teeth exhibited signs of “considerable” weathering, which the researchers say “points to dental use in attaching the prosthesis to the limb.” Finally, CT scans revealed cortical bone loss, which often happens with the presence of a prosthesis.
“This Longobard male shows a remarkable survival after a forelimb amputation during pre-antibiotic era,” write the researchers in the study. “Not only did he adjust very well to his condition, he did so with the use of a culturally-derived device, along with considerable community support. Most likely, he had a prosthesis that was used to protect the stump.”
https://gizmodo.com/medieval-italian-man-replaced-his-amputated-han...

Comment by Doone on April 15, 2018 at 1:36pm

shows the old world in the year 1000. Source:

Comment by Stephen on April 12, 2018 at 12:53pm

Volcanic eruptions in the 6th century plunged Eurasia into hunger and disease

A recent study indicates that volcanic eruptions in the mid 500s resulted in an unusually gloomy and cold period, and that the years 536 and 541-544 CE were very difficult for many people.

The oldest surviving Ptolemaic world map, redrawn according to his 1st projection by monks at Constantinople under Maximus Planudes around 1300

http://www.medievalists.net/2018/04/volcanic-eruptions-in-the-6th-c...

Comment by Stephen on April 11, 2018 at 6:25pm

How did Romans cope with snow? Winter on Hadrian’s Wall

caption

Housesteads Roman Fort, set high on a wild hilltop in Northumberland, once played a key role in defence along Hadrian’s Wall. It commands incredible views – but especially in the winter, that means it’s exposed to all the elements.
You might think that our unpredictable weather and often harsh winters would have been a shock to the troops. It’s a common misconception that the Romans stationed along Hadrian’s Wall came from the warmer Mediterranean climate of Italy. Actually, the troops at Housesteads generally came from Northern Europe – one unit was the Tungrians from modern Belgium.
The Hadrian’s Wall landscape around here is relatively unchanged since Roman occupation. It’s easy to imagine the winter conditions endured by the Romans 1,800 years ago – because our visitors and staff face them today! Luckily, the Romans had a number of ways to ensure they kept warm. And we’re well prepared for winter visitors too.

http://blog.english-heritage.org.uk/how-did-romans-cope-with-snow-w...

Comment by Stephen on March 12, 2018 at 1:38pm

'Entire streets' of Roman London uncovered in the City

Ths is a few years old but interesting all the same.

An archaeological dig in the heart of the City "will transform our understanding" of Roman London, experts claim.
About 10,000 finds have been discovered, including writing tablets and good luck charms.
The area has been dubbed the "Pompeii of the north" due to the perfect preservation of organic artefacts such as leather and wood.
One expert said: "This is the site that we have been dreaming of for 20 years."
Archaeologists expect the finds, at the three-acre site, to provide the earliest foundation date for Roman London, currently AD 47.
The site will house media corporation Bloomberg's European headquarters.
It contains the bed of the Walbrook, one of the "lost" rivers of London, and features built-up soil waterfronts and timber structures, including a complex Roman drainage system used to discharge waste from industrial buildings.
Organic materials such as leather and wood were preserved in an anaerobic environment, due to the bed being waterlogged.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-22084384

Comment by Stephen on March 12, 2018 at 1:10pm

Its funny Doone to most of us English the Normans just fade into the background. But nearly all of our Aristocracy come from these Norman families so their influence still lives on.

Comment by Doone on March 12, 2018 at 1:06pm

Interesting, Stephen, the Normans are comparatively recent in history.

Comment by Stephen on March 12, 2018 at 1:04pm

Normal for Normans? Exploring the large round mounds of England

Silbury Hill at sunrise: at 31m tall, Silbury is the largest prehistoric monument in Europe. A recent investigation set out to see if the monument had any prehistoric siblings in England. (Photo: Steve Marshall)

Most of England’s monumental mounds are assumed to be Norman castle mottes built in the period immediately after the Conquest – but could some of them have much earlier origins? Jim Leary, Elaine Jamieson, and Phil Stastney report on a project that set out to investigate some of these mighty constructions.

https://www.archaeology.co.uk/articles/normal-normans-exploring-lar...

 

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