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We are a worldwide social network of freethinkers, atheists, agnostics and secular humanists.

Secularism in the UK and Europe.and all those lucky places that doesnt have Trumps as its leader

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Secularism in the UK and Europe.and all those lucky places that doesnt have Trumps as its leader

To show that Secularism and Freethought are alive and well in the United Kingdom and Europe.

Members: 14
Latest Activity: 11 hours ago

Discussion Forum

Did Europe's centuries of religious war result in its secularism?

Started by May the Big Bang RIP. Last reply by Chris Jul 30, 2016. 8 Replies

Did long-term monarchs impose their religions?In the US, with presidents' terms limited to eight years, religions might be imposed by majorities in state legislatures or Congress or by majorities on state supreme courts or the US Supreme Court.Continue

Tags: state., church

Firms 'place asylum seekers in sub-standard housing'

Started by Stephen. Last reply by Mrs.B Jan 20, 2016. 1 Reply

Private security firms G4S and Serco have placed asylum seekers in sub-standard properties, according to a report by the National Audit Office.…Continue

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You need to be a member of Secularism in the UK and Europe.and all those lucky places that doesnt have Trumps as its leader to add comments!

Comment by Mrs.B on April 15, 2016 at 2:31pm

Typical. The public would rather have a liar in office than to have a leader profess a religion they don't buy.

Very odd..........I haven't received any emails with comment notices for a/u.

Comment by Stephen on April 14, 2016 at 5:43pm

Religious worship shouldn’t be a requirement of public office

Posted: Fri, 18 Mar 2016 10:47 by Stephen Evans

With an atheist mayor facing criticism for opting not to attend church services, Stephen Evans argues that elected officials shouldn't have to worship or feign religiosity in order to represent the citizens they serve.

The newly elected Mayor of Totnes has apparently "stirred up controversy" by opting not to attend religious ceremony because, although from a Jewish background, she does not practise any religion and does not believe in God.

According the report, Eleanor Cohen, the mayor elect of Totnes, will take part in the secular element of the Royal British Legion's Remembrance Sunday commemoration, but not the religious service.

Naturally, that isn't good enough for the Bishop of Plymouth, who insisted that "to hold public office means representing all members of the community, of all faiths, including Christian, and attending events which you might not always be in sympathy with or personally support."

The Bishop is absolutely right to argue that as mayor she should represent all members of the community, but when Ms Cohen pays her respects at the town's cenotaph that's exactly what she'll be doing. You don't need to attend church to represent Christians. The Bishop is therefore wrong to insist that non-Christians, if elected to public office, must attend Christian services. There should never be any compulsion in religion.

As an atheist myself I've attended many church services, weddings, christenings, funerals. I've attended Hindu services and Jewish ones too, but always out of choice.

Remembrance is personal, and must be meaningful. It isn't about feigning religion and remembering the Fallen in ways other people want you to. That's why our national commemoration of Remembrance Day should be reformed into a civic service to make it a truly inclusive national event for everyone.

People of faith are then free to then arrange their own Remembrance services in their own places of worship, and remember the Fallen in their own particular way.

One thing we do not share as a nation is religion. That's why the current entanglement of religion and state is so problematic. As Britain becomes increasingly diverse, religion's public role will only serve to cause more unnecessary tension and conflict.

It's time for the state to cut religion loose. Britain isn't a 'Christian country'. Let's end the charade of pretending it is.

In criticising Mayor of Totnes the Bishop of Plymouth claimed to respect everybody's right to disagree over matters of faith and belief, but it's clear he only respects that right as long as people kowtow to the religious privilege he has become accustomed to. A secular state not only frees believers from religious persecution, it also frees non-believers from religious compulsion – and that's the part about secularism that most bothers the bishops.

Stephen Evans is the campaigns manager of the National Secular Society. The views expressed in our blogs are those of the author and may not represent the views of the NSS.

http://www.secularism.org.uk/blog/2016/03/worshipping-shouldnt-be-a...

Comment by Stephen on April 14, 2016 at 4:37pm

Gender segregation: breaking the law to appease Islamism

Posted: Mon, 21 Mar 2016 16:13 by Chris Moos

The LSE and their Students' Union need to stop breaking equality legislation that is designed to protect students, and start listening to the Muslim women challenging gender segregation, argues Chris Moos.

Students and staff at the London School of Economics (LSE) are accustomed to being in the limelight. Whether it is taking money from North-African dictators, promoting anti-Muslim and homophobic charities or harassing atheist students for their 'blasphemous' t-shirts – LSE is often at the centre of controversy.

Now, another facet has been added to the picture. The London School of Economics Students' Union Islamic Society recently held a gender segregated dinner.

The legal situation is clear. In their guidance on 'Gender segregation at Events and Meetings: guidance for Universiti..., the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) states that:

Gender segregation is not permitted in any academic meetings or at events, lectures or meetings provided for students, or at events attended by members of the public or employees of the university or the students' union (EHRC, 2014: 2).

Please read more=

http://www.secularism.org.uk/blog/2016/03/gender-segregation--break...

Comment by Stephen on April 14, 2016 at 4:19pm

Church of England bishops are more elitist than David Cameron’s cabinet

Posted: Tue, 05 Apr 2016 12:35 by Ed Moore

A small, almost entirely Oxbridge-educated elite are given automatic seats in Parliament. How do we allow this to continue, asks Ed Moore.

In 2015 a widely debated report from the Sutton Trust pointed out just how many of David Cameron's new Conservative cabinet went to elite schools and universities and how unrepresentative this was of the general population of the country.

The Guardian calculated of the 32 people attending cabinet meetings:

- 50% went to Oxbridge

- 34% attended a Russell Group university other than Oxbridge

- 53% attended an independent school

- 7% attended grammar schools

If we do the same analysis on the current 40 enthroned or acting diocesan bishops how does it compare? Interestingly:

- 85% studied at Oxford or Cambridge

- 12.5% attended a Russell Group university other than Oxbridge

- 32.5% attended an independent school

- 32.5% attended a grammar school

Just one Bishop failed to attend an elite university and 5% more bishops attended a selective or fee-paying school than the perceived establishment Conservatives.

Read More=

http://www.secularism.org.uk/blog/2016/04/church-of-england-bishops...

Comment by Stephen on April 14, 2016 at 4:16pm

Muslim support for theocracy, not terrorism, is the real threat to confront

Posted: Thu, 14 Apr 2016 14:40 by Benjamin Jones

The ICM poll on 'What British Muslims Really Think' shows clearly that widespread support for Islamic theocracy, not terrorism, is the real, long-term threat to British society, argues Benjamin Jones.

Much of the discussion about the "What British Muslims Really Think" ICM poll, presented for Channel 4 by Trevor Phillips, has revolved around how many British Muslims sympathise with or support terrorism – but this is far from the greatest danger.

While 4% are willing to admit to having some sympathy with suicide bombers (more than 100,000 people if the poll is perfectly representative) and only 34% would report a friend who supported terrorism overseas, the real, existential threat to any kind of cohesive society is not from violent extremism. Terrorism poses no existential threat to the Western nation state, whereas a splintered society undermines the legitimacy of the state. Unless struggled with now this situation will be insoluble

Read More=

http://www.secularism.org.uk/blog/2016/04/muslim-support-for-theocr...

Comment by Stephen on April 14, 2016 at 3:59pm

When nearly 80% of Muslim Marriages in the UK are not seen as legal. Triple talaq: is becoming more prevalent.

Comment by Stephen on April 14, 2016 at 3:55pm

Triple talaq: India's Muslim women fight against instant divorce

India divorce protest

India is perhaps the only country in the world where a Muslim man can divorce his wife in a matter of minutes by just uttering the word talaq (divorce) three times. But this controversial practice of "triple talaq" is now facing a stiff challenge - the Supreme Court is considering whether to declare it unconstitutional, writes the BBC's Geeta Pandey in Delhi.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-35997390

Comment by Stephen on April 13, 2016 at 5:19am

Comment by May the Big Bang RIP on April 13, 2016 at 5:01am

I played a few minutes of the BBC clip.

Someone at the Huffington Post here in the US wrote on how Fox News is destroying the Republican Party and may have borrowed from the BBC story.

Comment by May the Big Bang RIP on April 13, 2016 at 4:46am

From the conversation, I'm guessing that traditional Islamic marriage will also be illegal in the US.

We use the term "common law" to denote stuff the colonists brought with them from England, such as common law marriage.

Each two-year-long congress (two one-year sessions) uses common parliamentary law until it adopts its own rules. Most of them do this in a few days.

 

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