Feedback and Notes

 

Imagine No Religion

Latest Activity

Doone has Fremdschämen commented on Michel's group Our Climate, Scumpism is Denialism
10 hours ago
Mrs.B commented on Adriana's group Freethought and Funny Bones
12 hours ago
Stephen left a comment for Herk
12 hours ago
Stephen left a comment for Gary
12 hours ago
Stephen left a comment for Black Dude
12 hours ago
Stephen commented on Adriana's group Freethought and Funny Bones
12 hours ago
Stephen commented on Adriana's group Freethought and Funny Bones
12 hours ago
Stephen commented on Adriana's group Freethought and Funny Bones
12 hours ago
Mrs.B left a comment for MIKE
12 hours ago
Stephen left a comment for MIKE
13 hours ago
Stephen left a comment for MIKE
13 hours ago
Stephen left a comment for MIKE
13 hours ago
Stephen left a comment for MIKE
13 hours ago
Profile IconMIKE and David William joined Atheist Universe
13 hours ago
Doone has Fremdschämen commented on Doone has Fremdschämen's group Canada, Mexico most of the World and Some Nutty Country Suffering from Fremdschämen about Scumpism News
13 hours ago
Mrs.B commented on Doone has Fremdschämen's group Canada, Mexico most of the World and Some Nutty Country Suffering from Fremdschämen about Scumpism News
16 hours ago
Davy replied to May the Big Bang RIP's discussion ..., because there is no god. in the group Freethought and Funny Bones
17 hours ago
Davy commented on Michel's group The Daily Cosmos or Interesting Facts about the Universe
17 hours ago
Davy replied to Mrs.B's discussion The Milky Way's long-lost sibling finally found
17 hours ago
May the Big Bang RIP commented on Michel's group The Daily Cosmos or Interesting Facts about the Universe
17 hours ago

We are a worldwide social network of freethinkers, atheists, agnostics and secular humanists.

Information

World History

A group about World History so that I do not end up spamming my USA and Non USA News Group

Location: #culture
Members: 18
Latest Activity: on Sunday

Discussion Forum

How the British Divided Up the Arab World

Started by Hope. Last reply by Chris Oct 15, 2016. 7 Replies

How the British Divided Up the Arab WorldThe development of the modern nation states throughout the Arab world is a fascinating and heartbreaking process. 100 years ago, most Arabs were part of the…Continue

Tags: Arab, World, Up, Divided, the

History Snippets

Started by Doone has Fremdschämen. Last reply by May the Big Bang RIP Oct 12, 2016. 3 Replies

AN AMERICAN CREATION STORYby Akim ReinhardtThere is scientific evidence indicating that Asiatic peoples migrated…Continue

Tags: Snippets, History

Old Time Religion and Buildings

Started by Doone has Fremdschämen. Last reply by Onyango Makagutu Nov 30, 2012. 1 Reply

Tatev Monastery - Tatev, ArmeniaThe Tatev monastery once played a notable role in the advancement of medieval Armenian culture when it housed the University of Tatev in the 14th and 15th…Continue

Tags: Buildings, and, Religion, Time, Old

THE FALL OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE AND THE RISE OF ISLAM

Started by Doone has Fremdschämen. Last reply by Doone has Fremdschämen Jul 11, 2012. 2 Replies

THE FALL OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE AND THE RISE OF ISLAMTom Holland in The Guardian:Whenever modern civilisations…Continue

Tags: AND, RISE, ISLAM, EMPIRE, ROMAN

Comment Wall

Nice Comment

You need to be a member of World History to add comments!

Comment by May the Big Bang RIP on May 11, 2018 at 6:05am

Disease can certainly cause migration.

DNA evidence for human migration requires science that didn’t exist a mere quarter century ago.

Were there also migrations for other reasons?

About a year ago I saw info about an ancient drought-caused migration from Asia into Europe. The dates given suggested that this migration resulted in the battles described in Caesar’s Gallic Wars.

Comment by Stephen on May 11, 2018 at 4:02am

Hun migrations 'linked to deadly Justinian Plague'

A mass burial of battle victims from the Xiongnu period in Mongolia. The Xiongnu warriors are linked to the nomadic people who would later become known as the Huns

Scientists say one of the deadliest plagues in history may be linked to the migration westward of the Hun peoples.
The Justinian Plague, which struck in 541 AD, may have killed as many as 25 million.
Now, scientists say the outbreak probably originated in Asia, not Egypt as contemporary and more recent chroniclers had thought.
The finding comes from analysis of DNA found in 137 human skeletons unearthed on the Eurasian steppe.
The steppe region covers a vast area, spanning some 8,000km from Hungary to north-eastern China. The large sample of individuals covers a date range of 2,500 BC - 1,500 AD.

Read more=  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-44046031

Comment by Stephen on May 6, 2018 at 3:40pm

I saw this vase when the British Museum held an event about gladiator competitions in Roman Britannia.

The so-called “Colchester Vase,” depicting four gladiators named by inscriptions as Secundus, Mario, Memnon, and Valentinus. Artist unknown; ca. 175 CE. Found in a Roman grave at West Lodge, Colchester (= ancient Camulodunum), England, UK; now in the Colchester Castle Museum. Photo credit: Carole Raddato.

Comment by Stephen on May 3, 2018 at 10:31am

The Theft of Our Values

Comment by Stephen on April 28, 2018 at 4:09pm

Wooden Shigir idol found to be over twice as old as Egyptian pyramids

A team of researchers in Germany has found evidence suggesting that the famous wooden Shirgir Idol is actually 11,500 years old. The team has documented their efforts and findings in a paper published on the Cambridge University Press site Antiquity.

The Shigir Idol was discovered in an ancient peat bog by miners in Russia back in 1890. Early analysis showed that it was made entirely of larch wood and was constructed from several chunks. It remained preserved for thousands of years because of antimicrobial properties found in the peat. The idol was also covered extensively with markings, some of which depicted tiny human faces. To this day, no one knows what most of the markings depict. It was also noted that some of the original pieces of the idol had been lost—it is believed that it originally stood approximately five meters tall. In 1997, a team in Russia used radiocarbon dating to estimate the age of the icon and found it to be approximately 9,500 years old.
Experts have studied the carvings on the idol over the years, and many have suggested they likely represent a form of art, possibly linked with spiritual or religious activities.
Recently, the team in Germany expressed interest it taking a closer look at the idol, which is normally housed in the Sverdlovsk Regional Museum, in Russia. Arrangements were made for the idol to be shipped to Germany, where it was studied, along with other original material found in the peat bog. Using accelerator mass spectrometry, the team found the true age of the idol to be approximately 11,500 years old, placing its creation at around the time of the end of the Ice Age. That age also makes it the oldest known wood monumental sculpture ever found and more than twice the age of the Egyptian pyramids. The researchers report that they also found another face carved into the wood, bringing the total to eight. Their findings suggest that researchers looking to better understand very early human behavior perhaps need to widen their search beyond the Fertile Crescent.  

https://phys.org/news/2018-04-wooden-shigir-idol-egyptian-pyramids....

Comment by Stephen on April 27, 2018 at 3:53pm

'Lynching is colour-line murder': the blistering speech denouncing America's shame

 The pioneering African American investigative reporter Ida B Wells gave this impassioned speech at the 1909 National Negro Conference

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/apr/27/ida-b-wells-barnett-n...

Comment by Stephen on April 25, 2018 at 9:31am

Wow that reminds me of the Constantine's head in Rome

Comment by Doone has Fremdschämen on April 25, 2018 at 9:16am

Man of La Venta , Olmec Civilization This colossal stone head in La Venta, Mexico was discovered back in 1947.

Comment by Stephen on April 17, 2018 at 4:16pm

Medieval Italian Man Replaced His Amputated Hand With a Knife

Italian anthropologists have documented a remarkable case in which a Medieval-era Italian male not only managed to survive the amputation of his right hand, he also used a bladed weapon as a prosthetic limb.
Over 160 tombs have been excavated at the Longobard necropolis of Povegliano Veronese in Veneto, Northern Italy, but this skeleton, pulled from the ground in 1996, is entirely unique. Dated to between the 6th and 8th centuries, the specimen, dubbed T US 380, is an older male who survived long after the amputation of his right hand. But as new research published in Journal of Anthropological Sciences now shows, he replaced the missing appendage with a knife, which he attached to the stump with a cap, buckle, and leather straps. What’s more, dental analysis shows he tied it on with his teeth.


The updated analysis of the skeleton, led by anthropologist Ileana Micarelli from the University of Rome, suggests the man’s right hand was removed by a single blow. Many Longobard males were involved in warfare, so it’s possible he lost it during combat. It’s also possible that it was surgically removed as part of some medical intervention, or it may have been chopped off as a judicial form of punishment, a behavior known among the Medieval Italian Lombards.
Regardless of what happened, it’s clear from the paleontological evidence that T US 380 survived the amputation, and the injury healed rather nicely. In fact, he managed to live for a very long time afterwards. Micarelli and her colleagues say it’s a remarkable example of a human surviving the loss of a limb prior to the introduction of sterilization techniques and antibiotics. The case suggests the presence of community-level support and an environment in which intensive care and healing could take place. It also shows that Longobard medics, or whoever performed the procedure, knew a thing or two about preventing blood loss.
Further analysis of the man’s bones points to the use of a prosthesis. Bony healing tissue called callus formed around the ends of the bone, which likely formed as the result of frequent biomechanical force. Supporting archaeological evidence exists in the form of a knife, a cap on the stump, and a D-shaped buckle with decomposed organic material around it, likely leather. Other male skeletons found at the site were buried with their arms by their sides, but T US 380 had his right arm placed across his torso, and a knife blade with the butt aligned with his amputated wrist.
But there’s other evidence as well. The specimen’s teeth exhibited signs of “considerable” weathering, which the researchers say “points to dental use in attaching the prosthesis to the limb.” Finally, CT scans revealed cortical bone loss, which often happens with the presence of a prosthesis.
“This Longobard male shows a remarkable survival after a forelimb amputation during pre-antibiotic era,” write the researchers in the study. “Not only did he adjust very well to his condition, he did so with the use of a culturally-derived device, along with considerable community support. Most likely, he had a prosthesis that was used to protect the stump.”
https://gizmodo.com/medieval-italian-man-replaced-his-amputated-han...

Comment by Doone has Fremdschämen on April 15, 2018 at 1:36pm

shows the old world in the year 1000. Source:

 

Members (18)

 
 
 

© 2018   Created by Atheist Universe.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service