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"I like vegetables! Especially Cauliflower!) Try this recipe - Baked Cauliflower Buffalo Bites"
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We are a worldwide social network of freethinkers, atheists, agnostics and secular humanists.


We do love our VEGGIES, but don't you sometimes get bored with your 'same-o' recipes? So let's spice them up, change the plan, move things around, and try something brand new. 

 

What is 'old hat' to you, might be new and exciting to me, so don't hesitate to share your favorite recipe in this discussion and add ones that look good enough to try.

 

(A Sydni discussion that needed to be restarted, I have an urge to post). =)

Views: 337

Replies to This Discussion

Sounds excellent, will have to try.

Weekday Vegetarian: Artichokes with Garlic Butter and Parsley Dip

by Kelly Rossiter, Toronto on 07.20.11 - Treehugger

http://www.treehugger.com/artichokes.jpg

 

My friend Barb, who I am travelling with in the French Alps, is a professed non-cook. However, she announced the other night that she could make artichokes and would make them for dinner. The artichokes here are bigger than any I have ever cooked, and two artichokes shared amongst four people was more than enough. Much as I do love artichokes, I have always viewed them as a device to move butter into my mouth. Consequently, I usually make the easiest thing possible, melted butter with a squeeze of lemon, but Barb's partner Mark made a wonderful garlicky butter dip that was fantastic.


There is a lot of garlic in this dip, so feel free to cut it back if you feel there is too much. you could also use roasted garlic for a mellower taste. We cooked these in the microwave, which is what I always do. Not only does it take significantly less time, it doesn't smell your house up for the day. I usually find about six minutes does it, but these artichokes were so huge, it took closer to fifteen.

Artichokes with Garlic Butter and Parsley Dip

2 - 4 artichokes, depending on size
1/4 lb butter, room temperature
2 cloves of garlic, minced
1 tbsp olive oil
1 tbsp parsley, finely chopped

 

1. Place minced garlic in a bowl, adding a bit of butter. Cover the bowl with cling wrap and cut some small holes in the top, allowing the steam to exit. Cook on high for 1 minute. Set aside and allow to cool.

2. Cut the stem off of the artichokes. Trim the leaves of the artichokes with scissors, removing the spiny end. Slice the top off of the artichoke and pour a little water into the top. Wrap the artichokes in cling film and place into the microwave and cook for 6 minutes on high heat. Test for doneness by pulling off one of the outer leaves. If it pulls away easily and the meat of it is soft, it is cooked.

3. While the artichokes are cooking, whisk the remaining butter and olive oil together and add to the cooked garlic. Stir in parsley until well mixed.

4. To eat, pull out the leaves and dip in the garlic butter dip. When you have eaten down to the centre, cut out the fuzzy choke and then slice the heart of the artichoke and dip in garlic butter.

More Artichoke Recipes

Grilled Baby Artichokes
Marinated Artichokes
Artichoke, Kale and Ricotta Pie

 

http://www.treehugger.com/files/2011/07/weekday-vegetarian-artichok...

 

Shells With Summer Squash, Corn, Beans and Tomato

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2011/08/16/health/16recipehealth/16recipehealth-articleLarge.jpg

 

You can use canned beans for this dish, but if you happen to have cooked pintos or borlottis in broth, use the broth for the pasta sauce.

 

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1/2 pound summer squash, diced (1/2 to 3/4 inch)

Salt to taste

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 pound tomatoes, grated on the large holes of a box grater, or peeled, seeded and diced

Pinch of sugar

Kernels from 1 ear sweet corn

1 1/2 cups cooked pintos or borlotti beans, with 3/4 to 1 cup of their broth or, if using canned beans, 1/2 to 3/4 cup water

2 tablespoons slivered basil leaves

Freshly ground pepper

3/4 pound medium pasta shells

1 to 2 ounces Parmesan or pecorino Romano, grated (optional)

1. Begin heating a large pot of water for the pasta.

2. Meanwhile, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat in a wide, heavy skillet. Add the summer squash. Cook, stirring, until the squash begins to color, three to five minutes. Season with salt, and add the garlic. Stir until fragrant, just a few seconds, and add the tomatoes and a pinch of sugar. Cook, stirring often, until the tomatoes have cooked down and smell fragrant, five to eight minutes. Stir in the corn, beans and bean broth or water, and season to taste with salt and pepper. Turn the heat to medium-low, and simmer for five minutes. Stir in the basil, and keep warm.

3. When the water comes to a boil, salt generously and add the pasta. Boil, following the timing directions on the package but checking a minute before the indicated time. When the pasta is cooked al dente, remove 1/2 cup of the cooking water, then drain the pasta and toss with the vegetables and beans. If the vegetable and bean mixture seems dry, moisten with pasta water to taste. Add the cheese, toss again and serve.

Yield: Serves four.

Advance preparation: You can make this recipe through Step 2 several hours before you cook the pasta, but don’t add the basil. Add it when you toss the mixture with the pasta.

Nutritional information per serving: 521 calories; 1 gram saturated fat; 2 gram polyunsaturated fat; 5 grams monounsaturated fat; 0 milligrams cholesterol; 92 grams carbohydrates; 11 gram dietary fiber; 17 milligrams sodium (does not include salt to taste), 20 grams protein

 

Related

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/16/health/nutrition/16recipehealth.h...

One of my favorite simple dishes, explained in a video by Mark Bitman: ratatouille.

 

Sorry, video doesn't embed.

 

 

String Beans With Ginger and Garlic

  • Salt
  • 2 1/2 pounds string beans (French-style slim haricots verts work especially well), trimmed
  • 4 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1/4 cup minced fresh ginger (about 6 inches ginger root, peeled)
  • 4 medium-size garlic cloves, minced

Preparation

1.
Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil, and fill a large bowl with ice water. Working in two batches, boil beans until just tender but still crisp and bright green. Start testing after 4 minutes or so, being careful not to overcook. When done, plunge beans into ice water to stop cooking, lift out immediately when cool and drain on towels. (Recipe can be made to this point up to a day in advance and kept refrigerated, wrapped in towels.)
2.
When ready to cook, heat 2 tablespoons oil in a wide skillet over high heat. Add half the beans, half the ginger and half the garlic, and cook, stirring and tossing constantly, until beans are heated through and ginger and garlic are softened and aromatic. Sprinkle with salt, and remove to a serving dish. Repeat with remaining oil, beans, ginger and garlic. Serve.

Giving Okra a Second Chance


Okra is one of those foods you either love or hate, depending on your first experience with it. My first okra tasting was at a Texas barbecue joint, where the okra was rolled in cornmeal and fried. What’s not to like?

 

But okra has more than its share of critics, who complain it gets slimy when cooked. One of them was Martha Rose Shulman, until she discovered several Mediterranean dishes with okra.

 

Until lately, I hadn’t been a fan of okra. But then I learned how cooks in the eastern and southern Mediterranean treat this popular vegetable: They cook it whole, after tossing it with salt and vinegar and marinating it for an hour to make it less, well, slimy. Some regional cooks dry okra in the sun after salting it.

 

Martha builds on her Mediterranean okra experience with a variety of new ways to prepare okra. Some of her recipes roast or stew the whole okra, while others call for sliced okra. There’s even a variation on cactus salad with okra as the star. Here are five new ways to give okra a second chance.

 

Roasted Okra: When okra is roasted, there’s no need to marinate it in salt and vinegar.

 

Turkish Chicken and Okra Casserole: Okra stewed with lamb or chicken is a Turkish staple.

 

Okra, Avocado and Tomato Salad With Chili and Lime Juice: This lively combination is inspired by a favorite Mexican cactus salad.

 

Algerian Okra, Potato and Tomato Tagine: Make this stew in any sort of heavy casserole, but an earthenware tagine works best.

 

Mediterranean Okra and Tomato Stew: Okra is stewed with tomatoes and onions throughout the Middle East and in Greece.

 

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/09/16/giving-okra-a-second-chance/

 

Baked Potato, Tomato & Zucchini Pesto Casserole Recipe

 

Inspired by/adapted from Whole Living Magazine

Ingredients:


1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 sweet onion, sliced
4 tablespoons pesto
2 medium organic tomatoes, sliced 1/4 inch thick
1 medium yellow or green zucchini, sliced 1/4 inch thick
3 red potatoes, sliced 1/4 inch thick
3 tablespoons freshly grated or shredded Parmesan
coarse salt and pepper, optional
ground black pepper, optional

 

Directions:


1. Heat the oven to 375 degrees. Heat the EVOO in over medium heat and then saute the onions for 5-6 minutes. Meanwhile, schmear 2 tablespoons of pesto over the bottom of a 12 inch casserole dish and cut up the potatoes, tomatoes and zucchini.

 

2. Scatter the onions over the pesto and then layer the potatoes, tomatoes and zucchini on top. Go crazy and create any pattern you like.

 

3. Brush the remaining 2 tablespoons of pesto on top, scatter the Parmesan on top and a few pinches of salt and pepper.

 

4. Cover with foil and bake for 30 minutes. Uncover and bake for 20 additional minutes. Feel free to scatter additional Parmesan on top – you deserve it!

 

 

 

Roasted Cauliflower & 16 Roasted Cloves of Garlic

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/__xjEM4Ls8Hs/S4P8HjJNp3I/AAAAAAAABU0/yCooi5oTJNA/s400/roasted_cauliflower.JPG

 

"Roasted brings out a wonderful sweetness in this dish. The Garlic is roasted to a tan color is creamy good. You can just pop them in your mouth. Or you can spread them on your florets or fresh bread. Just be sure to scoop up some of the rosemary, olive oil and black pepper that may have escaped to the bottom of the dish."

 

Ingredients:

Servings: 6

Units: US | Metric

 

Directions:

  1. Mix oil, rosemary, salt, pepper and garlic together.
  2. Toss in cauliflower and place in a large casserole dish in one layer.
  3. Roast in a preheated oven at 450 degrees for 20 minutes; give a toss and bake for 10 more minutes.

POTATO LATKAS/PANCAKES

http://www.thefoodsection.com/foodsection/images/potpan-thumb.jpg

2 large eggs

3 cups grated drained all-purpose potatoes

¼ cup grated onion

1 teaspoon salt, more to taste

¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2 to 4 tablespoons matzo meal, or as needed

Canola oil, for frying

Applesauce and sour cream for serving (optional).

1. In a large mixing bowl, beat eggs lightly. Add potatoes, onion, salt and pepper, and mix well. Stir in 2 tablespoons matzo meal, and let it sit about 30 seconds to absorb moisture in batter. If necessary add more to make a thick, wet batter that is neither watery nor dry.

2. Place a large skillet over medium heat, and add 2 tablespoons oil. When oil is hot drop in heaping 1/8 cups (about 2 tablespoons) of batter, flattening them gently to make thick pancakes. When bottoms have browned, after 2 to 3 minutes, flip and brown on other side. Add oil as needed. Drain on paper towels, and sprinkle with additional salt to taste. If necessary, work in batches, keeping cooked pancakes warm. Serve hot with applesauce and sour cream, if desired.

Yield: 4 servings (about 24 small pancakes).

Here are some additional tips to ensure “Pot Pan” success:

1. Mise en place. Have all of the ingredients ready to go before the potato shredding commences (peel the potatoes, mince the onions, and get the egg mixture ready [see #2]). To prevent the potatoes from browning, they may be peeled in advance and kept covered with water, but once they are shredded, you must work fast.


2. Beat the eggs and flour together. This is how it was done in the restaurant, despite what the recipe indicates.


3. The miracle of the oil. When frying, use a generous amount of oil. I use peanut oil, which will not burn during the cooking process.


4. The miracle of the food processor. A hand grater works perfectly well, but you can also save time, and your knuckles, by using a food processor with the grating blade.


5. Squeeze, squeeze, squeeze. Squeeze as much liquid out of the shredded potatoes as possible, pressing them against the side of the bowl to release their starchy water.

6. To prevent the potatoes from browning, they may be peeled in advance and kept covered with water, but once they are shredded, you must work fast.


7. Serve immediately. Though I’ve never tried to keep them warm in the oven, I fear that this might lead to a fall-off in crispiness.

On the Side
Applesauce and sour cream are the classic accompaniments to potato pancakes

Related

Feed Me : A Year-Round Craving for the Latkes of Yore

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/06/dining/061frex.html

Garden Salad Tacos

This thread has been dead too long, what, you think we covered all the possibilities? Had this for dinner last night with a side of spicy vegetarian/vegan black beans; did the trick. This is from Food & Wine, and since it was the first time I tried it I followed the recipe exactly.

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 tablespoon red wine vinegar

1/2 small garlic clove, finely grated

Pinch of ground cumin

Kosher salt

2 cups lightly packed mixed baby greens

1/2 small fennel bulb, very thinly sliced on a mandoline

1 medium carrot, very thinly sliced crosswise

4 radishes, very thinly sliced

1/2 cup lightly packed cilantro leaves

8 corn tortillas, warmed

3 ounces Monterey Jack cheese, shredded (1 cup)

Directions

Preheat a broiler. In a large bowl, whisk the olive oil with the vinegar, garlic, cumin and a pinch of salt. Add the baby greens, fennel, carrot, radishes and cilantro and toss to coat. Season the salad with salt.

Arrange the warm corn tortillas on a large baking sheet in a single layer. Sprinkle the shredded Jack cheese on the tortillas and broil 6 inches from the heat until the cheese is melted, about 1 minute. Pile the salad on the tortillas, fold them in half and serve right away.

Hi!

I'm a fan of Baked Cauliflower Buffalo Bites

Try!)) 

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