Feedback and Notes

 

Imagine No Religion

Latest Activity

Suzanna commented on Hope's group Imagine No Religion, Please!
4 hours ago
Suzanna commented on A Former Member's group Animal | Vegetable | Mineral or Super Hero
4 hours ago
Stephen left a comment for Jim Sturm
4 hours ago
Stephen left a comment for hotrod
4 hours ago
Stephen left a comment for G
4 hours ago
Stephen left a comment for Eiffer Goetz
4 hours ago
Mrs.B commented on Hope's group Imagine No Religion, Please!
4 hours ago
Stephen commented on Hope's group Imagine No Religion, Please!
4 hours ago
Harold N. Stern updated their profile
5 hours ago
Mrs.B commented on Doone's group Most of the Earth and the Trumpiest Country News
6 hours ago
Stephen commented on Doone's group Most of the Earth and the Trumpiest Country News
7 hours ago
Stephen commented on A Former Member's group The Burgeoning Family Tree of the Naked Ape
8 hours ago
Mrs.B commented on Doone's group Most of the Earth and the Trumpiest Country News
8 hours ago
Doone commented on Doone's group Most of the Earth and the Trumpiest Country News
8 hours ago
Doone commented on Hope's group Imagine No Religion, Please!
8 hours ago
Doone commented on A Former Member's group The Burgeoning Family Tree of the Naked Ape
8 hours ago
Mrs.B commented on Doone's group Most of the Earth and the Trumpiest Country News
9 hours ago
Doone commented on Michel's group The Daily Cosmos or Interesting Facts about the Universe
9 hours ago
Doone commented on Adriana's group Freethought and Funny Bones
9 hours ago
Doone commented on Doone's group Most of the Earth and the Trumpiest Country News
9 hours ago

We are a worldwide social network of freethinkers, atheists, agnostics and secular humanists.

The Burgeoning Family Tree of the Naked Ape

Information

The Burgeoning Family Tree of the Naked Ape

THE NAKED APE: Exploring the science and cultural evolution of human psychology, behavior, cognition, language, memory, intelligence, emotion, and consciousness. (Uh, did I miss anything?)

Location: #science
Members: 57
Latest Activity: 8 hours ago

Welcome to THE NAKED APE

Those who’ve know me for some time know that I have a moderately strong interest in human consciousness and psychology. Although mind and body cannot exist without one another – and indeed they shape one another – it does seem that the very core of the human experience of ‘self’ exists in the brain alone.

We all know that much of the functioning and maintenance of our body is controlled covertly by the brain or by biological systems that work beneath our threshold of awareness. We do not consciously decide to sweat, or digest our food, or replace our cells.

And yet, in spite of the fact that we know this, we still cling to the illusion that the functioning of our thoughts, our decisions, our perceptions, our preferences, our memories, and our reasoning are under our direct, conscious control.

But neuroscience and psychology are now showing us that this simply is not the case—that the processes of mind and awareness function just as covertly as our biological systems.

That fascinates me!

How is it that the mind – that place of concealment – is also the one place in which awareness itself is known to exist?

The truth is that we don’t know ourselves as well as we’d like to believe. We don’t control our decisions, our perceptions, our motivations, or our memories as well as we think we do.

THE NAKED APE was created to explore these important topics. I welcome any post on human psychology, behavior, cognition, perception, language, memory, intelligence, emotion, and consciousness.

 

Discussion Forum

DNA Testing

Started by Chris. Last reply by Chris May 11. 8 Replies

How Not to Think About Scrotum's

Started by Doone. Last reply by Chris Nov 17, 2017. 3 Replies

Our Orgastic Future

Started by Doone. Last reply by Neal Jun 18, 2013. 3 Replies

E.O. Wilson: Tribalism, Groupism, Globalism

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by A Former Member Jun 4, 2013. 7 Replies

Gestalt psychology

Started by A Former Member May 11, 2013. 0 Replies

On the usefulness of illusions

Started by Michel May 6, 2013. 0 Replies

How Whites Think About Race

Started by Neal. Last reply by Adriana Mar 20, 2013. 13 Replies

How to scare someone who knows no fear

Started by Adriana. Last reply by Adriana Feb 6, 2013. 6 Replies

10 Amazing Things People's Brains Have Done

Started by Michel. Last reply by Marianne Jan 19, 2013. 2 Replies

Paul Bloom: The Psychology of Everything

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by Michel Jan 2, 2013. 6 Replies

Comment Wall

Nice Comment

You need to be a member of The Burgeoning Family Tree of the Naked Ape to add comments!

Comment by Michel on December 16, 2011 at 7:03pm

29

Comment by Adriana on December 16, 2011 at 5:59pm

Friday Fun: Mind in the eyes (Simon Baron Cohen's page) . How good are you at reading the state of mind in people's eyes?

Instructions

For each pair of eyes, choose which word best describes what the person in the picture is thinking or feeling.

When you've answered all the questions, press the 'Get score' button at the bottom to see your results.


Most people surprise themselves by how well they do in this test. Even if you think you don't have a clue, just choose the one that 'feels' right.

warning from adriana: the pictures are horrible quality, with good pictures it could have been easier. My 2-cents. do not over-think.

Here's my score:

Your score: 31
A typical score is in the range 22-30. If you scored over 30, 
you are very accurate at decoding a person's facial expressions 
around their eyes. A score under 22 indicates you find this quite difficult.


 

Instructions

For each pair of eyes, choose which word best describes what the person in the picture is thinking or feeling.

When you've answered all the questions, press the 'Get score' button at the bottom to see your results.


Most people surprise themselves by how well they do in this test. Even if you think you don't have a clue, just choose the one that 'feels' right.

Have fun and share your score!

Comment by Doone on December 14, 2011 at 10:21am

Avoidance of overheating and selection for both hair loss and bipedality in hominins

  1. Graeme D. Ruxtona,1 and 
  2. David M. Wilkinsonb

+Author Affiliations

  1. aInstitute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, United Kingdom; and
  2. bSchool of Natural Sciences and Psychology, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 3AF, United Kingdom
  1. Edited by C. Owen Lovejoy, Kent State University, Kent, OH, and approved November 8, 2011 (received for review August 24, 2011)

Abstract

Two frequently debated aspects of hominin evolution are the development of upright bipedal stance and reduction in body hair. It has long been argued, on the basis of heat-balance models, that thermoregulation might have been important in the evolution of both of these traits. Previous models were based on a stationary individual standing in direct sunlight; here we extend this approach to consider a walking hominin, having argued that walking is more thermally challenging than remaining still. Further, stationary activities may be more compatible with shade seeking than activities (such as foraging) involving travel across the landscape. Our model predictions suggest that upright stance probably evolved for nonthermoregulatory reasons. However, the thermoregulatory explanation for hair loss was supported. Specifically, we postulate progressive hair loss being selected and this allowing individuals to be active in hot, open environments initially around dusk and dawn without overheating. Then, as our ancestors’ hair loss increased and sweating ability improved over evolutionary time, the fraction of the day when they could remain active in such environments extended. Our model suggests that only when hair loss and sweating ability reach near-modern human levels could hominins have been active in the heat of the day in hot, open environments.

Comment by Doone on December 14, 2011 at 10:19am

A reason for our being naked in the 1st place may be wrong:

STANDING TALL TO BEAT THE HEAT?

From Science:

Stand upright, cool off. That's long been touted as one of the benefits of our ancestors becoming bipedal in a hot and sunny world. But now researchers have poured cold water on the idea. A team examined how our ancient relatives, who were most likely covered with a thick pelt of hair, would fare while walking briskly in a sizzling place like the African savanna. The body dimensions used in the model—30 kg for females, 55 kg for males—were based on a group of early human ancestors, or hominins, such as Australopithicus afarensis, the species that includes the famous Kenyan fossil "Lucy." The models showed that a 30-minute trek put hairy hominins at risk of heat stroke whether ..., according paper published online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Earlier models supporting the connection between bipedalism and heat loss examined ancient humans standing still in the sun, which the new paper's authors argue is less realistic.

Posted by Azra Raza at 08:29 AM | Permalink 

Comment by A Former Member on December 11, 2011 at 9:28pm

Oh, here's the site.

Comment by A Former Member on December 11, 2011 at 9:27pm

I'm going to post this tidbit here because I do think it has some relevant statements about worldviews. However, they do use some language I don't like, namely "heal," "empower," and "nurture." Has a bit of the woo feel to it.

 

I don't know this site, someone just posted it elsewhere, so judge for yourself. If I have time soon I'll check it out more.

Contrasting Systems: Partnership and Domination

The following is a simplified chart describing Riane Eisler’s two contrasting systems for organizing human relations--partnership and domination--combining materials from Eisler's The Power of Partnership and David Korten's The Great Turning (which uses Eisler’s work as the book's framework).

Underlying the many differences in societies, both cross-culturally and through history, are two basic cultural configurations: the domination system and the partnership system.  Unlike conventional categories, the partnership and domination systems take into full account the most foundational human relations, without which none of us would be here: the relations between the female and male halves of humanity and between them and their daughters and sons.

The last three hundred years have produced a strong movement toward partnership.  One tradition of domination after another has been challenged – from despotic kings to child abuse. However, most families and relationships lie somewhere between the dominator and partnership poles.  We need to move along the spectrum in the partnership direction in order to heal and empower all our relationships.

The following is a simplified chart combining materials from Eisler's The Power of Partnership and David Korten's The Great Turning.

Partnership System

Domination System

Humans have many possibilities

Humans are flawed and dangerous

Difference is valued

Difference is equated with superiority or inferiority

Power is used to empower and nurture through hierarchies of actualization

Power is used to control and destroy through hierarchies of domination

Women and men are equally valued

Men are dominant

Men and women can be nonviolent, empathetic, and caring

Masculinity is equated with control, conquest, and violence

Competition means striving for excellence

Competition means "dog eat dog"

People cooperate for mutual benefit

People cooperate to dominate others

Economic structures are equitable

Huge gaps between haves and have nots

Nature is highly valued

Nature is depleted and polluted

Morality of sensitivity, caring, and respect

Morality of insensitivity, control, and coercion

Comment by Doone on December 11, 2011 at 6:59pm

The Origin Myth Of Dragons

One theory proposes that our primate ancestors needed a way to evoke three of our most dangerous predators (leopard, python, eagle) once we decided to walk on the ground. It's called the "snake/raptor/cat complex":

Faced with information overload, the brain of Australopithecus resorted to lumping information into manageable and memorable chunks. As a result, the cat, the snake, and the raptor were merged into a hybrid creature that had the salient predatory features of each: the face of a feline, the body of a snake, and the talons of a raptor. This is the hybrid “monster” that came to be known as the “dragon.”

Comment by Doone on December 9, 2011 at 2:11pm

WHY AREN'T WE SMARTER ALREADY?

From PhysOrg:

RatWe put a lot of energy into improving our memory, intelligence, and attention. There are even drugs that make us sharper, such as Ritalin and caffeine. But maybe smarterisn’t really all that better. A new paper published in Current Directions in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, warns that there are limits on how smart humans can get, and any increases in thinking ability are likely to come with problems. Tradeoffs are common in evolution. It might be nice to be eight feet tall, but most hearts couldn’t handle getting blood up that high. So most humans top out under six feet. Just as there are evolutionary tradeoffs for physical traits, Hills says, there are tradeoffs for . A baby’s brain size is thought to be limited by, among other things, the size of the mother’s pelvis; bigger brains could mean more deaths in childbirth, and the pelvis can’t change substantially without changing the way we stand and walk. Drugs like  and amphetamines help people pay better attention. But they often only help people with lower baseline abilities; people who don’t have trouble paying attention in the first place can actually perform worse when they take attention-enhancing drugs. That suggests there is some kind of upper limit to how much people can or should pay attention. “This makes sense if you think about a focused task like driving,” Hills says, “where you have to pay attention, but to the right things—which may be changing all the time. If your is focused on a shiny billboard or changing the channel on the radio, you’re going to have problems.”

It may seem like a good thing to have a better , but people with excessively vivid memories have a difficult life. “Memory is a double-edged sword,” Hills says. In post-traumatic stress disorder, for example, a person can’t stop remembering some awful episode. “If something bad happens, you want to be able to forget it, to move on.” Even increasing general intelligence can cause problems. Hills and Hertwig cite a study of Ashkenazi Jews, who have an average IQ much higher than the general European population. This is apparently because of evolutionary selection for intelligence in the last 2,000 years. But, at the same time, Ashkenazi Jews have been plagued by inherited diseases like Tay-Sachs disease that affect the nervous system. It may be that the increase in brain power has caused an increase in disease.

More here.

Posted by Azra Raza at 05:22 AM | Permalink 

Comment by Doone on December 6, 2011 at 9:39am

Hot Buzz

26,422TOTAL VIEWS

1.4XVIRAL LIFT

facebook.comstumbleupon.comgiornalettismo.comneogaf.comtwitter.comTOP REFERRERS

View Stats ›

European Map Of Penis Size


The results are in! After years of painstaking research, this map of European penis size is finally complete. Time to look up your dong ancestry. (via reddit.com)


Comment by Doone on December 3, 2011 at 7:30pm

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF NAKEDNESS

Jonah Lehrer in Wired:

ScreenHunter_01 Dec. 03 20.47And this brings me to a fascinating new paper by an all star team of psychologists, including Kurt Gray, Joshua Knobe, Mark Sheskin, Paul Bloom and Lisa Feldman Barrett. The scientists nicely frame the mystery they want to solve:

Do people’s mental capacities fundamentally change when they remove a sweater? This seems absurd: How could removing a piece of clothing change one’s capacity for acting or feeling? In six studies, however, we show that taking off a sweater—or otherwise revealing flesh—can significantly change the way a mind is perceived. In this article, we suggest that the kind of mind ascribed to another person depends on the relative salience of his or her body—that the perceived capacity for both pain and planned action depends on whether someone wears a sweater or tank-top.

In order to understand why sweaters and tank-tops influence the kind of minds we perceive, it’s important to know about the different qualities we imagine in others. In general, people assess minds – and it doesn’t matter if it’s the “mind” of a pet, iPhone or deity – along two distinct dimensions. First, we grade these minds in terms of agency. (Human beings have lots of agency; goldfish less so.) But we also think of minds in terms of the ability to have experience, to feel and perceive. The psychologists suggest that these dual dimensions are actually a duality, and that there’s a direct tradeoff between the ability to have agency and experience. If we endow someone with lots of feeling, then they probably have less agency. And if someone has lots of agency, then they probably are less sensitive to experience. In other words, we automatically assume that the capacity to think and the capacity to feel are in opposition. It’s a zero sum game.

What does all this have to do with nakedness? The psychologists demonstrated it’s quite easy to shift our perceptions of other people from having a mind full of agency to having a mind interested in experience: all they have to do is take off their clothes.

More here.

Posted by Abbas Raza at 02:49 PM | Permalink 

 
 
 

© 2018   Created by Atheist Universe.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service