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The Daily Cosmos

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Latest Activity: 21 hours ago

 

Cosmology - Astrophysics - Astronomy

 

Hubble Wallpaper - Awesome Hubble Images

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Comment by Stephen 21 hours ago

Comment by Stephen 23 hours ago

image

All Eyes on the Sky for the August 21 Total Solar Eclipse

Just two months from now, the moon will completely block the sun’s face, treating part of the US to a total solar eclipse.

https://nasa.tumblr.com/post/162085073374/all-eyes-on-the-sky-for-t...

Comment by Chris yesterday

On the same token many may have never seen bioluminescence.

I'm thinking of getting a black light to flouresce my ceiling which is painted "ceiling white." The walls are a muted clay color.

Comment by Chris yesterday

A Solar Eclipse will cross the U.S. August 21, 2017.   I'm thinking of visiting a friend in Oregon to view it.  Hopefully it won't be too cloudy.

It's a once in a lifetime oppertunity.

https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4518

Comment by Chris yesterday

Light pollution is a problem for viewing the 'heavens.' I have a small telescope that allowed me to view some of the moons of  Jupiter.

I find it sad that most people enjoy and are only able to see city lights vs. the stars and beauty of the milky way.   I wonder how many people have never been able to see the milky way.

Published on Sep 24, 2012

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Comment by Stephen yesterday

All you need to know: June solstice 2017

It’s that beautiful time of year again in the Northern Hemisphere, when the June solstice – your signal to celebrate summer – is nearly upon us.

From the December solstice to the June solstice, the sunset makes its way north, as illustrated in this photo composite by Abhijit Juvekar. Thanks, Abhijit!

The sunset has been making its way north, as illustrated in this 2016 photo composite by Abhijit Juvekar.

The June solstice – your signal to celebrate summer in the Northern Hemisphere and winter in the Southern Hemisphere – happens on June 21, 2017 at 4:24 UTC. That’s 11:24 p.m. CDT in North America on June 20. Translate to your time zone. For us in the Northern Hemisphere, this solstice marks the longest day of the year. Early dawns. Long days. Late sunsets. Short nights. The sun at its height each day, as it crosses the sky. Meanwhile, south of the equator, winter begins.

Read more=  http://earthsky.org/earth/everything-you-need-to-know-june-solstice

Comment by Mrs.B yesterday

Really hard to see.

Comment by Stephen yesterday

The feature that appears bright blue at the center of this scene is NASA's Curiosity Mars rover amid tan rocks and dark sand on Mount Sharp, as viewed by the HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on June 5, 2017. The rover is about 10 feet long and not really as blue as it looks here.Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of ArizonaFull image and caption

The feature that appears bright blue at the center of this scene is NASA's Curiosity Mars rover amid tan rocks and dark sand on Mount Sharp, as viewed by the HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on June 5, 2017. The rover is about 10 feet long and not really as blue as it looks here.Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of ArizonaFull image and caption

NASA Mars Orbiter Views Rover Climbing Mount Sharp

Using the most powerful telescope ever sent to Mars, NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter caught a view of the Curiosity rover this month amid rocky mountainside terrain.

The car-size rover, climbing up lower Mount Sharp toward its next destination, appears as a blue dab against a background of tan rocks and dark sand in the enhanced-color image from the orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera. The exaggerated color, showing differences in Mars surface materials, makes Curiosity appear bluer than it really looks.

The image was taken on June 5, 2017, two months before the fifth anniversary of Curiosity's landing near Mount Sharp on Aug. 5 PDT (Aug. 6, 2017, EDT and Universal Time).

When the image was taken, Curiosity was partway between its investigation of active sand dunes lower on Mount Sharp, and "Vera Rubin Ridge," a destination uphill where the rover team intends to examine outcrops where hematite has been identified from Mars orbit.

HiRISE obtains images of Curiosity a few times each year. The University of Arizona, Tucson, operates HiRISE, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colorado. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, California, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project and Mars Science Laboratory Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. 

For more information about NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, visit:

For more information about NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Project and Curiosity, visit:

Guy Webster
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
818-354-6278
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

Laurie Cantillo / Dwayne Brown
NASA Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1077 / 202-358-1726
laura.l.cantillo@nasa.gov / dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov

Comment by Stephen on Friday

Catching Starlight | ESOcast 112
June 16, 2017: Capturing and recording the light from the heavens has always been an essential aspect of astronomy. In this episode, we’re going to delve into the history of the sensors that have been used to study the Universe over the centuries.

Credit: European Southern Observatory (ESO)
Duration: 4 minutes
Release Date: June 16, 2017

Comment by Stephen on June 15, 2017 at 5:51pm

According to experts, there is evidence which suggests that all stars in the universe are born in pairs. For decades, scientists have speculated that our sun has an ‘evil’ twin referred to as NEMESIS—a dwarf star responsible for hurling objects from the outer solar system towards our planet. In fact, NEMESIS may even have been resposnible for mass extinctions that have rocked Earth for millions of years.

Left image: Radio image of a young binary system. Lower Right: Image of a triple star system formed from a disk of dust. All detected in the molecular cloud of Perseus. Upper right: Binary system located in the region IC 348 where the two stars interact by emitting pulses of light

Read more=  https://www.ancient-code.com/nemesis-scientists-find-evidence-our-s...

 
 
 

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