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The Daily Cosmos or Interesting Facts about the Universe

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The Daily Cosmos or Interesting Facts about the Universe

Cosmology
Astrophysics
Astronomy

Location: #science
Members: 58
Latest Activity: on Friday

 

Cosmology - Astrophysics - Astronomy

 

Hubble Wallpaper - Awesome Hubble Images

Discussion Forum

Big Bangers' Imaginations Supply Their Story's Only Support.

Started by Tom Sarbeck. Last reply by Joey Daniel Smith Dec 22, 2018. 7 Replies

'Hot Jupiter'

Started by Mrs.B. Last reply by Mrs.B Apr 9, 2016. 7 Replies

NASA's Solomon's Choice.

Started by Davy Oct 3, 2013. 0 Replies

This is Science at Work.

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Comment by Michel on October 27, 2011 at 2:19am

The Saturn neighborhood is simply awesome.

Comment by Doone has Fremdschämen on October 26, 2011 at 9:08pm

See Explanation. Clicking on the picture will download the highest resolution version available.

In, Through, and Beyond Saturn's Rings 
Image Credit: Cassini Imaging TeamISSJPLESANASA

Explanation: A fourth moon is visible on the above image if you look hard enough. First -- and farthest in the background -- is Titan, the largest moon of Saturn and one of the larger moons in the Solar System. The dark feature across the top of this perpetually cloudy world is the north polar hood. The next most obvious moon is bright Dione, visible in the foreground, complete with craters and long ice cliffs. Jutting in from the left are several of Saturn's expansive rings, including Saturn's A ring featuring the dark Encke Gap. On the far right, just outside the rings, is Pandora, a moon only 80-kilometers across that helps shepherd Saturn's F ring. The fourth moon? If you look closely in the Encke Gap you'll find a speck that is actually Pan. Although one of Saturn's smallest moons at 35-kilometers across, Pan is massive enough to help keep the Encke gap relatively free of ring particles.

Comment by Doone has Fremdschämen on October 25, 2011 at 8:50pm

See Explanation. Clicking on the picture will download the highest resolution version available.

HH-222: The Waterfall Nebula 
Image Credit: Z. Levay (STScI/AURA/NASA), T.A. Rector (U. Alaska Anchorage) & H. Schweiker (NOAO/AURA/NSF), KPNONOAO

Explanation: What created the Waterfall Nebula? No one knows. The structure seen in the region of NGC 1999 in the Great Orion Molecular Cloud complex is one of the more mysterious structures yet found on the sky. Designated HH-222, the elongated gaseous stream stretches about ten light years and emits an unusual array of colors. One hypothesis is that the gas filament results from the wind from a young star impacting a nearby molecular cloud. That would not explain, however, why the Waterfall and fainter streams all appear to converge on a bright but unusual non thermal radio source located toward the upper left of the curving structure. Another hypothesis is that the unusual radio source originates from a binary system containing a hot white dwarfneutron star, or black hole, and that the Waterfall is just a jet from this energetic system. Such systems, though, are typically strong X-rays emitters, and no X-rays have been detected. For now, this case remains unsolved. Perhaps well-chosen future observations and clever deductive reasoning will unlock the true origin of this enigmatic wisp in the future.

 

Comment by Chris on October 24, 2011 at 9:30pm

Its amazing how much light pollution there is.

Comment by Adriana on October 24, 2011 at 1:35pm

Wow. beautiful picture.

Comment by Michel on October 24, 2011 at 1:33pm

My new desktop background:

On Flickr:

Midwestern U.S. Night With Aurora Borealis (NASA, International Space Station, 09/29/11)

Editor's note: Incredible photos from the ISS! This has also been added to the NASA Views Earth at Night photoset: www.flickr.com/photos/28634332@N05/sets/72157625188331491/

The Midwestern United States at night with Aurora Borealis is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 29 crew member on the International Space Station. The night skies viewed from the space station are illuminated with light from many sources. For example, the Midwestern United States presents a night-time appearance not unlike a patchwork quilt when viewed from orbit. The artificial light from human settlements appears everywhere with a characteristic yellow tinge in this photograph. But green light of the Aurora Borealis also appears strongly in this view (top left)—even seeming to be reflected off Earth's surface—in Canada—beneath the aurora. A small white patch of light is almost certainly lightning from a storm on the East coast (top right). Part of the International Space Station appears across the top of the image. This photograph highlights the Chicago, IL, metropolitan area as the largest cluster of lights at center, next to the dark patch of Lake Michigan. The other largest metropolitan areas include St. Louis, MO (lower right), Minneapolis--St. Paul, MN (left) and the Omaha--Council Bluffs region on the Nebraska--Iowa border (lower left). City light clusters give an immediate sense of relative city size; demographers have used night time satellite imagery to make estimates of city populations, especially in the developing world where city growth can be very rapid. The U.S. northeast seaboard lies in the most oblique (meaning viewed at an angle) part of the image at top right, just beyond the Appalachian Mts., a dark winding zone without major cities.

Scales change significantly in oblique views: Omaha is only 200 kilometers from Des Moines, but appears roughly the same distance from Minneapolis—which is actually 375 kilometers to the north of Des Moines. In addition to the major metropolitan areas, the rectangular NS/EW-oriented pattern of townships is clearly visible in the rural, lower left part of the image. This pattern instantly gives the sense of north orientation (toward the top left corner) and is a distinctive characteristic of the United States, so that ISS crew members can quickly know which continent they are flying over even at night. In contrast to the regular township pattern, interstate highways converge on St. Louis (e.g. Hwy 44), Chicago and other large cities, much like wheel spokes around a central hub. Rivers—major visual features in daylight—become almost invisible at night. The course of the Mississippi River appears as a slightly meandering zone from Minneapolis through St. Louis (dashed line)—the river course continues out of the lower right corner of the image.

 

Comment by Michel on October 24, 2011 at 12:59pm

@Syd - PLS upload as a Video =)

Comment by Sydni Moser on October 24, 2011 at 9:11am

Christoph Adami: Finding life we can't imagine

 

Uploaded by TEDtalksDirector on Oct 4, 2011

http://www.ted.com How do we search for alien life if it's nothing like the life that we know? At TEDxUIUC Christoph Adami shows how he uses his research into artificial life -- self-replicating computer programs -- to find a signature, a 'biomarker,' that is free of our preconceptions of what life is.

Comment by Michel on October 23, 2011 at 10:25am

This still from an animation by Analytical Graphics, Inc., depicts the re-entry of Germany's defunct ROSAT satellite in October 2011. 
CREDIT: Analytical Graphics, Inc.

This still from an animation by Analytical Graphics, Inc., depicts the re-entry of Germany's defunct ROSAT satellite in October 2011. This story was updated at 11:18 p.m. ET.

An old German satellite plunged to Earth today (Oct. 22) after languishing in a dead orbit for more than a decade, but officials do not yet know where it fell.

The 2.7-ton Roentgen Satellite, or ROSAT, slammed into Earth's atmosphere sometime between 9:45 p.m. EDT (0145 GMT Sunday) and 10:15 p.m. EDT (0215 GMT Sunday), according to officials at the German Aerospace Center.

"There is currently no confirmation if pieces of debris have reached Earth's surface," German aerospace officials said in a statement.

While the 21-year-old satellite broke apart as it re-entered Earth's atmosphere, German aerospace officials estimated that up to 30 pieces totaling 1.9 tons (1.7 metric tons), consisting mostly of the observatory's heat-resistant mirrors and ceramic parts, could survive the fiery trip and reach the surface of the planet.

Based on ROSAT's orbital path, these fragments could be scattered along a swath of the planet about 50 miles (80 kilometers) wide, German aerospace officials have said.

The satellite, which weighs 5,348 pounds (2,426 kilograms), was launched into orbit in June 1990 to study X-ray radiation from stars, comets, supernovas, nebulas and black holes, among other things. The satellite was originally designed for an 18-month mission, but it far outlived its projected lifespan. [Photos of Doomed ROSAT Satellite]

In 1998, the ROSAT's star tracker failed and its X-ray sensors pointed directly at the sun. This caused irreparable damage to the satellite, and it was officially decommissioned in February 1999.

More on Space.com

 

Comment by Michel on October 22, 2011 at 9:14pm
 
 
 

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