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The Daily Cosmos or Interesting Facts about the Universe

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The Daily Cosmos or Interesting Facts about the Universe

Cosmology
Astrophysics
Astronomy

Location: #science
Members: 58
Latest Activity: on Monday

 

Cosmology - Astrophysics - Astronomy

 

Hubble Wallpaper - Awesome Hubble Images

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Comment by Adriana on October 29, 2011 at 9:31am

It's great to got to see this, JM!! No chance here in NYC! Check out my Weekly Science Fix (blog) for a link to more images. And do not miss the video "The Mountain"

Comment by Jean Marie on October 28, 2011 at 11:38pm

I SAW THIS! I SAW THIS!!  JUST THE OTHER NIGHT, two nights ago, maybe.  Flipped right out!  what a shock!  what an awesome breathtaking surprising sight!  I"d never ever seen them here before!!

the one i saw, was psychedelic pink, magenta, and silver........WOW AND WOW!! 

 

I was out walking the dog, and it caught my eye immediately, it was HUGE, covered half the sky, and was sort of undulating a bit, too. 

 

 I ran back home, made my family wrap up in blankets and throw on shoes to come out to see it.  They didn't really feel like it, but i insisted.  They were amazed, and really stoked, it WAS something to behold... 

 

wow..............SO GLAD YOU POSTED THIS, DOONE, i had been meaning to investigate to see what that WAS!!??  OR rather, WHY, after all these years, i am now seeing aororas HERE in THIS town!!?! 

 I did recognize them, having only seen them THAT dramatically in photos before, but, i had no idea WHY i can NOW see them here....cool!!!

Comment by Doone on October 28, 2011 at 11:23pm

See Explanation. Clicking on the picture will download the highest resolution version available.

October Skylights 
Image Credit & CopyrightMalcolm Park

Explanation: As northern hemisphere nights grow longer, October is a good month for spotting auroras, or even other eerie apparitions after dark. And this week the night sky did not disappoint. On October 24th a solar coronal mass ejection impacted planet Earth's magnetosphere triggering far ranging auroral displays. On that night, this dramatic silhouette against deep red and beautiful green curtains of shimmering light was captured near Whitby, Ontario, Canada. But auroras were reported even farther south, in US states like Alabama, Kansas, and Oklahoma at latitudes rarely haunted by the northern lights. Well above 100 kilometers, at the highest altitudes infused by the auroral glow, the red color comes from the excitation of oxygen atoms.

 

Comment by Michel on October 27, 2011 at 3:57pm

Check-out the series of really fantastic lightning pictures here.

Comment by Michel on October 27, 2011 at 2:19am

The Saturn neighborhood is simply awesome.

Comment by Doone on October 26, 2011 at 9:08pm

See Explanation. Clicking on the picture will download the highest resolution version available.

In, Through, and Beyond Saturn's Rings 
Image Credit: Cassini Imaging TeamISSJPLESANASA

Explanation: A fourth moon is visible on the above image if you look hard enough. First -- and farthest in the background -- is Titan, the largest moon of Saturn and one of the larger moons in the Solar System. The dark feature across the top of this perpetually cloudy world is the north polar hood. The next most obvious moon is bright Dione, visible in the foreground, complete with craters and long ice cliffs. Jutting in from the left are several of Saturn's expansive rings, including Saturn's A ring featuring the dark Encke Gap. On the far right, just outside the rings, is Pandora, a moon only 80-kilometers across that helps shepherd Saturn's F ring. The fourth moon? If you look closely in the Encke Gap you'll find a speck that is actually Pan. Although one of Saturn's smallest moons at 35-kilometers across, Pan is massive enough to help keep the Encke gap relatively free of ring particles.

Comment by Doone on October 25, 2011 at 8:50pm

See Explanation. Clicking on the picture will download the highest resolution version available.

HH-222: The Waterfall Nebula 
Image Credit: Z. Levay (STScI/AURA/NASA), T.A. Rector (U. Alaska Anchorage) & H. Schweiker (NOAO/AURA/NSF), KPNONOAO

Explanation: What created the Waterfall Nebula? No one knows. The structure seen in the region of NGC 1999 in the Great Orion Molecular Cloud complex is one of the more mysterious structures yet found on the sky. Designated HH-222, the elongated gaseous stream stretches about ten light years and emits an unusual array of colors. One hypothesis is that the gas filament results from the wind from a young star impacting a nearby molecular cloud. That would not explain, however, why the Waterfall and fainter streams all appear to converge on a bright but unusual non thermal radio source located toward the upper left of the curving structure. Another hypothesis is that the unusual radio source originates from a binary system containing a hot white dwarfneutron star, or black hole, and that the Waterfall is just a jet from this energetic system. Such systems, though, are typically strong X-rays emitters, and no X-rays have been detected. For now, this case remains unsolved. Perhaps well-chosen future observations and clever deductive reasoning will unlock the true origin of this enigmatic wisp in the future.

 

Comment by Chris on October 24, 2011 at 9:30pm

Its amazing how much light pollution there is.

Comment by Adriana on October 24, 2011 at 1:35pm

Wow. beautiful picture.

Comment by Michel on October 24, 2011 at 1:33pm

My new desktop background:

On Flickr:

Midwestern U.S. Night With Aurora Borealis (NASA, International Space Station, 09/29/11)

Editor's note: Incredible photos from the ISS! This has also been added to the NASA Views Earth at Night photoset: www.flickr.com/photos/28634332@N05/sets/72157625188331491/

The Midwestern United States at night with Aurora Borealis is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 29 crew member on the International Space Station. The night skies viewed from the space station are illuminated with light from many sources. For example, the Midwestern United States presents a night-time appearance not unlike a patchwork quilt when viewed from orbit. The artificial light from human settlements appears everywhere with a characteristic yellow tinge in this photograph. But green light of the Aurora Borealis also appears strongly in this view (top left)—even seeming to be reflected off Earth's surface—in Canada—beneath the aurora. A small white patch of light is almost certainly lightning from a storm on the East coast (top right). Part of the International Space Station appears across the top of the image. This photograph highlights the Chicago, IL, metropolitan area as the largest cluster of lights at center, next to the dark patch of Lake Michigan. The other largest metropolitan areas include St. Louis, MO (lower right), Minneapolis--St. Paul, MN (left) and the Omaha--Council Bluffs region on the Nebraska--Iowa border (lower left). City light clusters give an immediate sense of relative city size; demographers have used night time satellite imagery to make estimates of city populations, especially in the developing world where city growth can be very rapid. The U.S. northeast seaboard lies in the most oblique (meaning viewed at an angle) part of the image at top right, just beyond the Appalachian Mts., a dark winding zone without major cities.

Scales change significantly in oblique views: Omaha is only 200 kilometers from Des Moines, but appears roughly the same distance from Minneapolis—which is actually 375 kilometers to the north of Des Moines. In addition to the major metropolitan areas, the rectangular NS/EW-oriented pattern of townships is clearly visible in the rural, lower left part of the image. This pattern instantly gives the sense of north orientation (toward the top left corner) and is a distinctive characteristic of the United States, so that ISS crew members can quickly know which continent they are flying over even at night. In contrast to the regular township pattern, interstate highways converge on St. Louis (e.g. Hwy 44), Chicago and other large cities, much like wheel spokes around a central hub. Rivers—major visual features in daylight—become almost invisible at night. The course of the Mississippi River appears as a slightly meandering zone from Minneapolis through St. Louis (dashed line)—the river course continues out of the lower right corner of the image.

 

 
 
 

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