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We are a worldwide social network of freethinkers, atheists, agnostics and secular humanists.

Secularism in the UK and Europe.and all those lucky places that doesnt have Trumps as its leader

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Secularism in the UK and Europe.and all those lucky places that doesnt have Trumps as its leader

To show that Secularism and Freethought are alive and well in the United Kingdom and Europe.

Members: 13
Latest Activity: Jun 12

Discussion Forum

Did Europe's centuries of religious war result in its secularism?

Started by Tom Sarbeck. Last reply by Chris Jul 30, 2016. 8 Replies

Did long-term monarchs impose their religions?In the US, with presidents' terms limited to eight years, religions might be imposed by majorities in state legislatures or Congress or by majorities on state supreme courts or the US Supreme Court.Continue

Tags: state., church

Firms 'place asylum seekers in sub-standard housing'

Started by Stephen. Last reply by Mrs.B Jan 20, 2016. 1 Reply

Private security firms G4S and Serco have placed asylum seekers in sub-standard properties, according to a report by the National Audit Office.…Continue

Comment Wall

Nice Comment

You need to be a member of Secularism in the UK and Europe.and all those lucky places that doesnt have Trumps as its leader to add comments!

Comment by Stephen on February 20, 2018 at 12:10pm

NSS says UK should follow Iceland’s lead to end genital cutting

The National Secular Society has called on the UK Government to "follow the lead" of Icelandic lawmakers who are expected to ban cutting boys' genitals for non-medical reasons.
A draft bill currently before the Icelandic parliament says circumcision without consent is a violation of children's human rights. "While it is certainly the right of parents to give their children guidance when it comes to religion, such a right can never exceed the rights of the child," it says.
NSS says UK should follow Iceland’s lead to end genital cutting

http://www.secularism.org.uk/news/2018/02/nss-says-uk-should-follow...

Comment by Stephen on February 20, 2018 at 12:06pm

In a major change to Irish education, secondary school students no longer "have to" study religion

Religion will effectively be made optional in Irish secondary schools.
The Minister for Education, Richard Bruton has confirmed the change in a circular released today, stating that it is a constitutional right for students who chose not to participate in religion class to be offered an alternative, meaningful program.
Community and ETB (Education and Training Board) schools will now offer students a different subject, should they opt out of studying religion. 

Previously, students who chose not to partake in religious education - which required parental consent and approval from the school principle - were forced to sit at the back of the class or in the library with no alternative study offered. In many cases, these students were not allowed to complete coursework of any other subject while in the class, nor were they allowed wear earphones.

Groups such as Atheist Ireland have long campaigned on the issue of religious education in State schools for parents and students who are not religious. 
The change will come into effect immediately in more than 300 multi-denominational second-level schools.
Minister Bruton (below) stated, "It is important that Education and Training Board (ETB) and Community Post Primary schools as multi-denominational schools, fully implement this circular as it presents an important opportunity to meet the expectations of parents and students in a changing society."

Groups such as Atheist Ireland have long campaigned on the issue of religious education in State schools for parents and students who are not religious. 
The change will come into effect immediately in more than 300 multi-denominational second-level schools.
Minister Bruton (below) stated, "It is important that Education and Training Board (ETB) and Community Post Primary schools as multi-denominational schools, fully implement this circular as it presents an important opportunity to meet the expectations of parents and students in a changing society."

Comment by Stephen on February 18, 2018 at 6:36pm

Labour Party black sections reborn as a new movement

Grassroots Black Left is a new grouping aimed at revitalising black and ethnic minority participation. DEBORAH HOBSON reports from its parliamentary launch

MORE than 100 people from around the country crammed into a House of Commons room named for the parliamentary launch of Grassroots Black Left (GBL).
They were Sikhs, Hindus, Muslims, Christians, Jews, people of no faith, Africans, Caribbeans, Asians, other people of colour, and their white allies.

https://www.morningstaronline.co.uk/article/labour-party-black-sect...

Comment by Stephen on February 16, 2018 at 4:44pm

The Guardian view on religious education: teach humanism too 


why should anyone wish to learn about religion? Religion is, in the phrase of the sociologist Linda Woodhead, “a toxic brand”. In the public imagination the word summons up images of violence, patriarchy and irrationalism. The facile confidence of the “New Atheist” movement in the early years of this century was pushing at an open door. Religious studies nevertheless remains a surprisingly popular A-level subject, although this may owe something to its reputation as an easy one. A recent YouGov poll found that the British public thinks that RE is a subject scarcely more important than Latin, which the public, wrongly, does not care about at all. The National Association of Teachers of Religious Education has just launched an appeal for more teachers.
The association is quite right: religious education matters a great deal. At the very least it can function as a kind of ethnography, teaching people about the customs and beliefs of different religious cultures – something that is obviously desirable in a multicultural society. To know that Muslims and Jews won’t eat pork, or that Hindus regard cows as sacred, is really just a part of civics. There is nothing specifically religious about such teaching, even if it is by convention part of religious education. It could just as well be taught under geography or history, subjects profoundly influenced by the beliefs and actions of religious people. The real task of RE is much more ambitious.
The peculiar difficulty of religious education, which distinguishes it from all other subjects, is that it deals with beliefs that are not true in the way that the facts of other subjects can be. The sciences deal in testable facts; pupils can and do rediscover by experiment the truths of physics or of chemistry and biology. In history, economics and even literature, there are methods of inquiry that will converge around the generally accepted picture of the world. But there is no experiment that can determine whether God is love, or whether Muhammad is his prophet. There is no experiment that can determine the truth of a humanist belief in human rights. These are the sort of beliefs that can all appear absurd from a hostile perspective, and where they flourish they are not taught as schoolroom propositions but transmitted in thick cultural bundles of habit and ritual: that is why there are so many middle-aged agnostics who still love to sing the hymns of their childhood. The truth of such propositions is tested by the heart. Their meaning is personal, and grows over the course of a lifetime.
What religious education might do that no other subject can is to help people think about this kind of moral reasoning and imagination. Ethics, and even to some extent philosophy, can’t be taught only in the classroom. A good school teaches ethics – such as the virtues of tolerance and respect – continually in every lesson and outside the classroom too. Pupils learn about them by practising them. To box them away into particular classes – whether these are called ethics, philosophy or RE – diminishes their importance. But there is still a place for reflecting on what a school is doing and for how it understands itself. RE is the study of how values are embedded in culture and how they present themselves in our imagination. For most young people today this comes through a kind of undogmatic humanism. That should certainly be one of the subjects studied in RE. But this needs to be part of a much bigger shake-up. At a time when British identity feels uncertain, RE provides an important tool for understanding ourselves and where we’re going.

Comment by Mrs.B on February 16, 2018 at 3:34pm

And re-tweeted!

Comment by Stephen on February 16, 2018 at 3:26pm

Comment by Mrs.B on February 13, 2018 at 2:00am

Love sunset pics.

Comment by Stephen on February 13, 2018 at 1:57am

Taking in the view at sunset from the top of Tower 42, London

Photo

Comment by Mrs.B on February 11, 2018 at 5:52pm

They talk privatizing here too.

Comment by Stephen on February 11, 2018 at 5:42pm

The Tory's have lied to us about not privatising the NHS for years but some how some Brits still believe them. Idiots.  

 

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