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Science!

This group is for all science lovers and science fans, you don't need to be a scientist to enjoy talking or learning about science!

Website: http://atheistuniverse.net/group/science
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Latest Activity: Nov 30

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The Denisova genome

Started by Adriana. Last reply by Tom Sarbeck Apr 23. 7 Replies

Remember the 40,000 year-old Denisova finger bone that yielded sufficient DNA to…Continue

Tags: evolution, human, genome, DNA, hominin

Do You Need The Universe To Have Had A Beginning?

Started by Tom Sarbeck. Last reply by Tom Sarbeck Nov 19, 2016. 31 Replies

Many if not all human societies have origin myths and they differ greatly.Several years ago a San Francisco-born-and-raised woman told me she is a materialist.An hour ago a woman who was raised a Jehovah Witness and has left that faith told me the…Continue

Tags: cosmology, cosmogeny, evidence, need, universe

Florida schoolgirl charged with felonies for science experiment

Started by Neal. Last reply by Chris Sep 27, 2016. 3 Replies

No science for you woman! Photo: FreeLearningLife - FlickrWednesday, May 1, 2013 -…Continue

Tags: felony, a, becomes, experiment, science

Mandating Scientific Discovery Never Works But politicians can’t seem to grasp that.

Started by Neal. Last reply by Chris Aug 31, 2016. 4 Replies

GOP decides that research should be legislated. Usual nonsense.By Lawrence Krauss|Posted Friday, June 21, 2013, at 7:30 AM…Continue

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Science Bits, News, Videos

Started by Adriana. Last reply by Tom Sarbeck Aug 24, 2016. 1364 Replies

This discussion is to have a recurrent thread for science news, tidbits, quick…Continue

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Tully Monster

Started by Mrs.B. Last reply by Mrs.B Mar 17, 2016. 2 Replies

Solving the mystery of the Tully MonsterPosted: 16 Mar 2016 12:13 PM PDTThe Tully…Continue

Super weeds in the US

Started by Davy. Last reply by Chris Aug 18, 2014. 1 Reply

New York (AFP) - The United States is facing an epidemic of herbicide-resistant "superweeds" that some activists and researchers are blaming on GMO's, an accusation rejected by industry giants.According to a recent study, the situation is such that…Continue

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Platypus Godzilla.

Started by Davy. Last reply by Davy Nov 20, 2013. 5 Replies

And you thought the platypus was a nice, cuddly little monotreme. You would not have thought so 5 to 15 million years ago. Palaeontologists have uncovered the fossil of a platypus that looks as though it is on steroids.  The platypus dub the…Continue

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Aussie algae fuel green oil hope

Started by Davy Oct 20, 2013. 0 Replies

Aussie algae fuel green oil hopeDespite the claims of some, commercially viable fuels from algae have not yet been developed. But newly trialled native algae species provide real hope, a Queensland scientist has found.Dr Evan Stephens and the team…Continue

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Mystery moss rediscovered

Started by Davy. Last reply by Davy Oct 20, 2013. 2 Replies

News from James Cook University. Mystery moss rediscoveredA botanical puzzle more than 150 years old could soon be solved, thanks to a discovery by a second-year botany student in Queensland’s far north.James Cook University student Megan Grixti…Continue

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Comment by Doone on March 19, 2011 at 10:44am
Comment by Doone on March 19, 2011 at 10:09am

Space may be like a chessboard or honeycomb according to this paper:

Spin and the Honeycomb Lattice: Lessons from Graphene

Abstract
No Citing Articles
Download: PDF (193 kB) Buy this article Export: BibTeX or EndNote (RIS)
 

 

Matthew Mecklenburg1,2 and B. C. Regan1,2,* 
1Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA
2California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA

 Received 31 October 2010; published 16 March 2011

A model of electrons hopping from atom to atom in graphene’s honeycomb lattice gives low-energy electronic excitations that obey a relation formally identical to a 2+1 dimensional Dirac equation. Graphene’s spin equivalent, “pseudospin,” arises from the degeneracy introduced by the honeycomb lattice’s two inequivalent atomic sites per unit cell. Previously it has been thought that the usual electron spin and the pseudospin indexing the graphene sublattice state are merely analogues. Here we show that the pseudospin is also a real angular momentum. This identification explains the suppression of electron backscattering in carbon nanotubes and the angular dependence of light absorption by graphene. Furthermore, it demonstrates that half-integer spin like that carried by the quarks and leptons can derive from hidden substructure, not of the particles themselves, but rather of the space in which these particles live.

© 2011 American Physical Society

DOI:
10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.116803
PACS:
73.22.Pr, 03.65.Pm, 11.15.Ha, 71.10.Fd

 

Comment by Doone on March 18, 2011 at 7:12pm
I have a blog with links to two children's books on the Big Bang and Evolution http://atheistuniverse.net/profiles/blogs/bang-the-universe-verse-b... you can see the small PDF versions of the two books there.  Enjoy and comment if you care!
Comment by Neal on March 18, 2011 at 10:24am
I like.
Comment by Adriana on March 18, 2011 at 10:12am
That video should be posted on the main page
Comment by Doone on March 18, 2011 at 10:07am
A beautiful video, Hope, I never get tired of seeing the images and hearing the music.
Comment by Hope on March 18, 2011 at 10:04am

The Inner Life of the Cell

Comment by Doone on March 18, 2011 at 9:11am
Comment by Doone on March 18, 2011 at 8:18am

THE WORST CASE: WHAT IF THE WATER RAN DRY IN THE JAPANESE REACTORS?

From Science:

JapanWhat if cooling in one or more of the reactors at the Fukushima nuclear plant were lost? Richard Lester, chair of the department of nuclear science and engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, emphasizes the "very, very" unlikely possibility of that scenario. But if it were to occur, the inherent heat of the radionuclides would cause the fuel in the reactors to melt. Here's what would happen next. In the event of a meltdown, the fuel could melt through and flow out of the primary pressure vessel, falling into the so-called core capture chamber which sits below the reactor for this very purpose. That vessel has water that would hopefully cool the molten fuel down, eventually ending the crisis. If this didn't happen, however, a steam explosion could blow out the primary containment vessel, spewing massive quantities of radioactive aerosols as well as particulates. With towns evacuated at a perimeter of 30 kilometers, the lethality of that release "would depend on the winds," says Lester.

How would this compare to the disaster at Chernobyl? As noted in the New Scientist:

At Chernobyl the pressure vessel was breached and the reactor had no containment. There, the core itself burned fiercely, largely because it was made of graphite - which was used as the moderator… once the reactor exploded the graphite made the situation worse, because it burned so readily. The fires carried radioactive material from the reactor core high into the atmosphere, where it spread far and wide. This could not happen at Fukushima Daiichi, as it does not use graphite as the moderator.

More here.

Comment by Doone on March 17, 2011 at 8:07pm

Which is more Important Old Genes or New Genes?  This answer is found here http://sciblogs.co.nz/southern-genes/2011/03/18/are-newly-evolved-g...

Some scientists at the University of Chicago examined the dispensability of newly evolved genes in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. By comparing the genome of D. melanogaster with those of other closely related fruit flies, they identified a bunch of newly evolved genes. They then knocked down the functions of these genes one by one, and  observed the effect these knockdowns had on the flies, and whether they survived and were normal.

The somewhat surprising result was that a whopping 30% of newly evolved genes were essential for the flies’ viability. What do I mean by viability? If the genes were knocked out, the flies died.

How does this compare to ‘old’ genes? The researchers performed the same experiment using ancient genes, and found that 35% were essential. That’s not much different from 30%, suggesting that new genes are just as important as old genes for survival!

 
 
 

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