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Animal | Vegetable | Mineral | Fungus or Scump

Information

Animal | Vegetable | Mineral  | Fungus or Scump

Exploring the Earth and Animal Sciences

Location: #science
Members: 58
Latest Activity: Oct 10

Welcome to Animal | Vegetable | Mineral

I never cease to be awed by the splendor of the natural world, by the forces that shape the earth, and by the diversity and ingenuity of the life that populates it.

Animal | Vegetable | Mineral is a group where those who share this fascination can discuss the Earth and animal sciences of geology, volcanology, seismology, ecology, ethology, primatology, entymology—basically all the –ologies of the natural world. 
 

For general science, chemistry, genetics, or evolution, please post in the Science! group. For posts on animal rights and welfare, please post in Animal Care. For cosmology, please post in The Daily Cosmos. For green living, sustainability, and environmental activism, please post in the Green Atheists group.


ONGOING THREADS
Action Alert & Petition Thread
Beautiful Photographs of Animals & Nature
News Thread: Empathy and Reciprocity in Animals
The AVM Book Thread
The AVM Video Thread
Website Links: Conservation, Protection, and Advocacy

 

Discussion Forum

Endangered elephant killings rising in Indonesia

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by Chris Dec 24, 2016. 1 Reply

Beautiful Photographs of Animals & Nature

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by Doone has Fremdschämen Mar 1, 2015. 850 Replies

New species found in Australia

Started by Neal. Last reply by Neal Nov 3, 2013. 2 Replies

Cockatoos can pick complicated locks!

Started by Michel. Last reply by Neal Jul 11, 2013. 5 Replies

200-Year-Old Fish Caught Off Alaska

Started by Doone has Fremdschämen Jul 5, 2013. 0 Replies

The intelligence of octopuses

Started by Adriana. Last reply by Doone has Fremdschämen Jun 24, 2013. 3 Replies

Darwin's Frogs Are in Steep Decline

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by Neal Jun 15, 2013. 1 Reply

How Dogs Help Protect Threatened Species

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by Neal Jun 15, 2013. 1 Reply

The AVM Video Thread

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by Doone has Fremdschämen Jun 12, 2013. 402 Replies

8 Awesome Octopus Facts for World Oceans Day

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by Doone has Fremdschämen Jun 9, 2013. 1 Reply

Atlantic puffins in peril in US

Started by A Former Member Jun 8, 2013. 0 Replies

Plan lifts Lower 48 wolf protections

Started by A Former Member Jun 8, 2013. 0 Replies

Defenders of Wildlife

Comment Wall

Nice Comment

You need to be a member of Animal | Vegetable | Mineral | Fungus or Scump to add comments!

Comment by Doone has Fremdschämen on June 26, 2018 at 7:17am

I have a lot of bananas growing, the Banana eating bird color is great for green bananas.  

We are learning a hell of a lot about our ancestors.

Comment by Stephen on June 26, 2018 at 7:03am

Neanderthal nose: All the better to breathe with

Neanderthals had large, protruding noses to warm and humidify cold, dry air, a study into the distinct design of our extinct European cousin's face suggested Wednesday.

Using 3-D models of the skulls of Neanderthals, modern humans, and Homo heidelbergensis—considered to have been the common ancestor of both—an international research team found very different breathing adaptations.
Computerised "fluid dynamics" revealed that the shape of Neanderthal and human faces "condition air more efficiently" than H. heidelbergensis, suggesting that "both evolved to better withstand cold and/or dry climates," the researchers wrote in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
Neanderthals could also move "considerably more" air through their nasal cavity than could H. heidelbergensis or modern humans—possibly in response to higher energy requirements for their stocky bodies and hunting lifestyle.
Neanderthals were thought to have required as much as 4,480 calories per day to keep them alive in the European winter. For a modern human male, 2,500 daily calories are recommended.
A high-calorie intake requires more oxygen to burn the sugars, fats and proteins in our cells to produce energy.
Take a deep breath
Scientists have long debated over the reason for the Neanderthal's face shape, which includes a large, wide nose and protruding upper jaw.
One theory was they were built to exert more bite force.
But Wednesday's study said this was not the case. Computer simulations showed that Neanderthals "were not particularly strong biters" compared to humans.

But "where the Neanderthal really excelled is in its ability to move large volumes of air through its nasal passage, indicating a very high-energy lifestyle."
The conclusion, said the team, was "that the distinctive facial morphology of Neanderthals has been driven, at least in part, by adaptation to cold"—both to "condition" cold, dry air, and to absorb more oxygen.


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-04-neanderthal-nose.html#jCp

Comment by Stephen on June 26, 2018 at 6:49am

Bird family tree is shaken by the discovery of feathered fossil

They're some of the strangest birds in the world, known for their bright plumage and their penchant for fruit.
The turacos, or banana-eaters, are today found only in Africa, living in forests and savannah.
A beautifully preserved fossil bird from 52 million years ago is shaking up the family tree of the exotic birds.
The fossil's weird features suggests it is the earliest known living relative not just of the turacos, but of cuckoos and bustards (large long-legged birds).
And the fact the remains were unearthed in North America shows the distribution of different birds around the globe would have been very different in the past.
The banana-eaters
"Our analyses show with some strong support that the fossil is the earliest known representative of this group, the turacos, or the banana-eaters, that today are only found in sub-Saharan Africa," said Dr Daniel Field, a vertebrate palaeontologist in the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath.
"Although, our fossil comes from western North America and it's about 52 million years old."

Read more=.  https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-44604170

Comment by Mrs.B on June 24, 2018 at 6:42pm

Or he's family.....

Comment by Doone has Fremdschämen on June 24, 2018 at 6:03pm

I think Scump's hair may be composed of many of these bugs

The yeti crab, an unusual, hairy crab with no eyes, was discovered in 2005 on a hydrothermal vent near Easter Island. It is notable for the quantity of silky blond setae (resembling fur) covering its pereiopods (thoracic legs, including claws)

Comment by Doone has Fremdschämen on June 23, 2018 at 10:45pm

When hippos splashed in the wetlands of England.... A magnificent hippopotamus tusk from the Last Interglacial deposits at Barrington near Cambridge. Around 125,000 years old and on display

Comment by Stephen on June 23, 2018 at 4:02pm

Grey squirrels were first introduced to England from North America in 1876 as an ornamental species to populate the grounds of stately homes. Around 30 separate introductions occurred until 1930 when the damage caused by the grey squirrel was recognised and it was made illegal to release a grey squirrel to the wild.

Reds versus greys: squirrel facts

Reds:
Also known as: Squirrel Nutkin
Approximate size: 16 inches long, 9-12oz
Where to spot them: Scotland and pockets of England and Wales.
How many in the UK: 160,000 

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Greys:
Also known as: Timmy Tiptoes/Tree rats
Approximate size: 20 inches long, 14-20oz
Where to spot them: Now dominant across England and Wales and found in local pockets in Scotland.
How many in the UK: 2.5 million

Comment by Stephen on June 23, 2018 at 3:21pm

There is hardly any native Red Squirrels left in England just patches in the north. They are being pushed back into Scotland and Wales by the non-native and larger Grey Squirrel. I can remember seeing reds in the big London parks when I was a kid, but now all you see is the less cute grey.

Comment by Doone has Fremdschämen on June 23, 2018 at 2:40pm

A recent study finds that European pine martens are helping conservation of the declining Eurasian red squirrel in Scotland by reducing the numbers of invasive eastern gray squirrels:

Comment by Doone has Fremdschämen on June 23, 2018 at 2:01pm

Scump for Sure

A sign in San Francisco! Viva la resistance!

 
 
 

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