Feedback and Notes

 No Gods

Latest Activity

Mrs.B commented on Doone's group Planet Earth, Canada and Planet Scump News
3 hours ago
Stephen left a comment for Terence Lowe
3 hours ago
Stephen left a comment for Tebuho Mulala
3 hours ago
Stephen left a comment for Tammy Tucker
3 hours ago
Stephen left a comment for Avery Grander
3 hours ago
Stephen commented on Doone's group Planet Earth, Canada and Planet Scump News
3 hours ago
Mrs.B commented on Doone's group Planet Earth, Canada and Planet Scump News
4 hours ago
Stephen commented on Doone's group Planet Earth, Canada and Planet Scump News
4 hours ago
Chris replied to Chris's discussion Cell Telephones
9 hours ago
Doone commented on A Former Member's group The Burgeoning Family Tree of Monkey Men and Women
12 hours ago
Lutz replied to Chris's discussion Cell Telephones
13 hours ago
Lutz posted discussions
13 hours ago
Chris commented on Clayton Rhofes's blog post my rant thing,skip to the last 3 paragraphs
13 hours ago
Chris posted a discussion
13 hours ago
Chris commented on Clayton Rhofes's blog post my rant thing,skip to the last 3 paragraphs
14 hours ago
Chris commented on Doone's group Planet Earth, Canada and Planet Scump News
20 hours ago
Chris commented on Doone's group Planet Earth, Canada and Planet Scump News
20 hours ago
Mrs.B commented on Doone's group Planet Earth, Canada and Planet Scump News
yesterday
Stephen left a comment for John McMaster
yesterday
Stephen left a comment for EXMUSLIM
yesterday

We are a worldwide social network of freethinkers, atheists, agnostics and secular humanists.

Animal | Vegetable | Mineral | Fungus or Scump

Information

Animal | Vegetable | Mineral  | Fungus or Scump

Exploring the Earth and Animal Sciences

Location: #science
Members: 59
Latest Activity: Jul 10

Welcome to Animal | Vegetable | Mineral

I never cease to be awed by the splendor of the natural world, by the forces that shape the earth, and by the diversity and ingenuity of the life that populates it.

Animal | Vegetable | Mineral is a group where those who share this fascination can discuss the Earth and animal sciences of geology, volcanology, seismology, ecology, ethology, primatology, entymology—basically all the –ologies of the natural world. 
 

For general science, chemistry, genetics, or evolution, please post in the Science! group. For posts on animal rights and welfare, please post in Animal Care. For cosmology, please post in The Daily Cosmos. For green living, sustainability, and environmental activism, please post in the Green Atheists group.


ONGOING THREADS
Action Alert & Petition Thread
Beautiful Photographs of Animals & Nature
News Thread: Empathy and Reciprocity in Animals
The AVM Book Thread
The AVM Video Thread
Website Links: Conservation, Protection, and Advocacy

 

Discussion Forum

How Dogs Help Protect Threatened Species

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by Joey Daniel Smith Dec 27, 2018. 2 Replies

Cockatoos can pick complicated locks!

Started by Michel. Last reply by Chris Dec 17, 2018. 6 Replies

Endangered elephant killings rising in Indonesia

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by Chris Dec 24, 2016. 1 Reply

Beautiful Photographs of Animals & Nature

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by Doone Mar 1, 2015. 850 Replies

New species found in Australia

Started by Neal. Last reply by Neal Nov 3, 2013. 2 Replies

The intelligence of octopuses

Started by Adriana. Last reply by Doone Jun 24, 2013. 3 Replies

Darwin's Frogs Are in Steep Decline

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by Neal Jun 15, 2013. 1 Reply

The AVM Video Thread

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by Doone Jun 12, 2013. 402 Replies

8 Awesome Octopus Facts for World Oceans Day

Started by A Former Member. Last reply by Doone Jun 9, 2013. 1 Reply

Atlantic puffins in peril in US

Started by A Former Member Jun 8, 2013. 0 Replies

Plan lifts Lower 48 wolf protections

Started by A Former Member Jun 8, 2013. 0 Replies

Defenders of Wildlife

Comment Wall

Nice Comment

You need to be a member of Animal | Vegetable | Mineral | Fungus or Scump to add comments!

Comment by Adriana on March 18, 2011 at 11:24am
Comment by Adriana on March 15, 2011 at 2:28pm
Beautiful photos, remarkable photos at the link.

Camera Traps Reveal Secret Animal Worlds

 

Catching images of wild animals, especially rare ones, can be exceedingly difficult for photographers. But the Smithsonian Institution recently released more than 200,000 wildlife images captured by automated cameras hidden in forests, mountains and savannas across the globe.

Called Smithsonian Wild, the project harbors five years’ worth of photographs collected in seven countries by dozens of camera traps that take photos when animals wander nearby. Some are equipped with night vision, strobe flashes and other gizmos, and some can record video.

“Each camera-trap image is a record of an animal in space and time, a record of life on Earth. To my knowledge, this is the largest database of such photos in existence,” said the Smithsonian’s Robert Costello, co-leader of the project. “If you create a research-grade repository that’s safe and secure, it’s going to be useful to researchers for a long, long time.”

The scent of one person can spook shy creatures for miles around, which is when camera traps come in handy. The devices take pictures only when an animal’s heat signature is detected by sensors inside a weatherproof housing. Hunters have popularized camera traps to better track and map game, but scientists use them to observe secretive animal behaviors, estimate at-risk wildlife populations and even rediscover species once thought to be extinct.

 

“Many animals leave virtually no sign of their existence, so camera traps are just a godsend for people like me,” said wildlife ecologist William McShea of the Smithsonian Institution, co-leader of the project. “It’s much better than looking at a handful of feces and wondering what dropped it. These images are like museum-quality specimens with collection dates, locations, species names and other veracious metadata.”

Comment by Adriana on March 15, 2011 at 12:25pm
Ocean acidification- a great National Geographic article, posted in the green Atheists group (link)
Comment by Adriana on March 14, 2011 at 2:48pm
Check out this discussion on how humans connect with animals that i posted in the DOG group, animal lovers will love it, regardless of whether you have a dog or not.
Comment by Sydni Moser on March 10, 2011 at 11:19am

The Bionic Turtle (video)

posted by Cris Popenoe

 

Yu Chan: The Bionic Turtle (video)

Yu Chan, a Loggerhead turtle, lost parts of two flippers and a tail from a shark attack. In Japan, a company that usually makes prosthetics for humans, made artificial flippers for Yu Chan. They were strapped on to the stumps and Yu Chan was put into a tank to see if they would work.

They did. So Yu Chan was released back into the sea to regain her life—the world’s first bionic turtle.

 

Comment by Michel on March 8, 2011 at 10:20pm
The orgs can't do much when it's the habitat that is depleted if not completely zapped.
Comment by Michel on March 8, 2011 at 9:42pm
@DG - So true!
Comment by Adriana on March 8, 2011 at 9:15pm

ScienceShot: Capuchins' Screwy Solution to a Termite Problem

on 8 March 2011, 7:01 PM | | 0 Comments
sn-monkeys.jpg
Credit: Camila Bione

Anyone who has tried to eat ice cream with a biodegradable spoon can sympathize with the blonde capuchin monkey: It's hard to eat when your utensils keep bending or breaking. So, tired of finding new tableware every time they wanted termites for dinner, these critically endangered Brazilian monkeys figured out a clever solution that hasn't been observed before in any species. Balanced on two feet and their prehensile tails, capuchins tap a nest of termites with one hand to dislodge the bugs and then pierce the nest with a stick, screwing it in so that the stick doesn't break. Then they lick the delicious termites off the end. When human researchers aped the capuchins' methods, they found that the combination of banging the nest and rotating the stick retrieved significantly more termites. Their paper, published today in Biology Letters, doesn't mention whether the researchers thought they tasted any better this way.
Comment by Adriana on March 8, 2011 at 4:47pm
Depressing thought, DG. It hadn't occurred to me.
Comment by A Former Member on March 8, 2011 at 4:19pm
The dark side of adding animals to the endangered species lists is that it makes them more valuable to hunters and collectors just becuase they are "endangered."

This is one reason why the Chinese poachers are trying to drive elephants to extinction. It's going to make the ivory the collect all that more valuable, because it is irreplaceable.
 
 
 

© 2019   Created by Atheist Universe.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service