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Fri, 24 Feb 2017 07:01:00 EST
The parents of a 15-year-old boy who died from starvation and neglect have been found guilty of first-degree murder by a Calgary judge.

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it doesn't say why these people denied there son treatment for his Diabetes awful as their crime was it doesn't say why they did it.

I think I posted the story quite some time ago when it happened, but couldn't find it.

I had intended to post this one as an update to that story where murder charges were brought last June.

Here's a link...........

http://www.alternet.org/civil-liberties/diabetic-15-year-old-weighi...

Oh Yea I remember now. What bastards how could they sit back and watch their son die because they believed in prayer instead of medicine. IDIOTS.

My eldest son was diagnosed at age 5 with diabetes, & we had him in to the dr. because he had stopped growing, had no energy, & ate like a glutton.

Within 1 week of insulin injection, he grew an inch & gained 3 pounds!

How could any idiot rely on prayer????!!!!! Any mother worth her salt know within hours whether something is working for her kid or not!!!!!!

This happened in Oregon often and probably occurs more than is reported, or prosecuted. Parents who neglect their childrens medical care need to be incarcerated for at a minimum 'involuntary' manslaughter. Cleargy who encourage prayer while disuading parents from getting medical attention for their should be tried as accomplises. Illness from not giving Vaccines should be included inspite of kookie claims that vaccines cause Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

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The book Bad Faith by Dr. Paul Offit covers this. I haven't read the book, but heard Paul Offit talk about this topic and the book several times on the radio. 

When Jesus said, “Suffer the children,” faith healing is not what he had in mind.

In recent years, there have been major outbreaks of whooping cough among children in California, mumps in New York, and measles in Ohio’s Amish country—despite the fact that these are all vaccine-preventable diseases. Although America is the most medically advanced place in the world, many people disregard modern medicine in favor of using their faith to fight life-threatening illnesses. Christian Scientists pray for healing instead of going to the doctor, Jehovah’s Witnesses refuse blood transfusions, and ultra-Orthodox Jewish mohels spread herpes by using contaminated circumcision tools. Tragically, children suffer and die every year from treatable diseases, and in most states it is legal for parents to deny their children care for religious reasons. In twenty-first century America, how could this be happening?

In Bad Faith, acclaimed physician and author Dr. Paul Offit gives readers a never-before-seen look into the minds of those who choose to medically martyr themselves, or their children, in the name of religion. Offit chronicles the stories of these faithful and their children, whose devastating experiences highlight the tangled relationship between religion and medicine in America. Religious or not, this issue reaches everyone—whether you are seeking treatment at a Catholic hospital or trying to keep your kids safe from diseases spread by their unvaccinated peers.

Replete with vivid storytelling and complex, compelling characters, Bad Faith makes a strenuous case that denying medicine to children in the name of religion isn’t just unwise and immoral, but a rejection of the very best aspects of what belief itself has to offer.

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NBC NEWS - Health, Mar 9, 2015

Doctor to Legislators: Refusing Medical Care Isn't Religious Freedom

They stood by and watched their children die.

One after another, Dr. Paul Offit described the parents who prayed instead of getting their children the medical are they needed.

Herbert and Catherine Schaible prayed and prayed, but their 2-year-old son Kent died of pneumonia in Philadelphia 2009. It was bacterial pneumonia, and antibiotics could have saved him. They were convicted of child endangerment and involuntary manslaughter and placed on probation but horribly, the same thing happened again just four years later. In 2013, their 8-month old son Brandon died, again of bacterial pneumonia.

"We believe in divine healing, that Jesus shed blood for our healing and that he died on the cross to break the devil's power," Herbert Schaible said in a 2013 police statement. Medicine, he said, "is against our religious beliefs..."

...

"How do we allow this to happen?" asks Offit, perhaps America's most prominent advocate of vaccination. Mainstream religions, Offit says, embrace medicine. Yet American lawmakers continue to protect what he calls "delusional cults".

"It doesn't happen in England. It doesn't happen in Canada. You will go to jail and you will lose your children," he said. He points to Oregon's 2011 law that eliminates religious exemptions to criminal charges after 83 children of people belonging to the Followers of Christ Church had died, some of them from documented treatable conditions such as diabetes and one from an agonizing hernia.

"And there hasn't been a single death of a child among the Followers of Christ Church in Oregon since," Offit writes.

"When it happened in Oregon, people changed their behavior," he argues.

Some states are acting as havens for people who say they believe that God will heal the sick and that medical intervention is not only unnecessary, but contrary to God's will, Offit says.

Some Followers of Christ Church moved to Idaho, he says, "which has a religious exemption to manslaughter and where the death rate among the children of the Followers is 10 times greater than in the general population."

"You need to draw a line between what is a deeply felt religious belief and what is a dangerous, delusional cult."

Pennsylvania may have convicted the Schaibles, but Offit says legislation did not follow.

More here

Kooks like this are able to conceal child neglect and abuse easier when the child is 'home schooled.'

From a broader perspective, what about the violence of the religious underpinnings of the Syrian Civil War? The Shia-Sunni split? Why was Brain Rossell, a chemical weapons soldier, refused treatment for PTSD?

Brain Rossell? 

How much are the underpinnings of the Syrian Civil War a result of climate change and political conflicts over resources?

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